Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A) Feb. 5 (Isaiah 58:6-10; Psalm 112; 1 Corinthians 2:1-5; Matthew 5:13-16)

Spiritual illiteracy is one of the principal weaknesses of our time. It is far too common to read the Scriptures without sensitivity or understanding, seeking only lists of prohibitions, rules and details of proper worship. 

Published in Fr. Scott Lewis

There’s a strange tenderness in harsh Prairie winters. In the midst of deep fog, the temperature swings slowly, visibility declines, ice and frost coat the roads and the windows, and the hoar frost wraps the power lines and the trees. We can easily get lost in fog, and our movement through it is reduced to wandering one miniscule and tentative step at a time, our senses attuned to the tiniest and most immediate signals of our place in space and time.  

Published in Register Columnists

Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A) Jan. 29 (Zephaniah 2:3; 3:12-13; Psalm 146; 1 Corinthians 1:26-31; Matthew 5:1-12)

The humble of the land are the foundation of God’s kingdom and the mortar that holds our world together. 

Published in Fr. Scott Lewis

Third Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A) Jan. 22 (Isaiah 9:1-4; Psalm 27; 1 Corinthians 1:10-13, 17-18; Matthew 4:12-23)

Gloom and God do not go together, for God is life and light. Isaiah’s prophecy was addressed to Galilee and Samaria, who had been crushed by the Assyrian invasion and destruction of the land in 722 B.C. They had indeed walked in darkness, and this contributed to their downfall. Although they had been warned many times through prophecy, they had not heeded the calls to repentance and reform. 

Published in Fr. Scott Lewis

Second Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A) Jan. 15 (Isaiah 49:3, 5-6; Psalm 40; 1 Corinthians 1:1-3; John 1:29-34)

To whom is Isaiah’s prophecy addressed? Many of the prophetic texts of the Old Testament are difficult to follow, for the speaker and the addressee are often unclear. The ambiguity is at times deliberate, for a symbol can apply simultaneously to more than one person, situation or event. It appears that in this case the one given the divine mission of leading Jacob back to God was the mysterious and unnamed Suffering Servant. 

Published in Fr. Scott Lewis

Epiphany of the Lord (Year A) Jan. 8 (Isaiah 60:1-6; Psalm 72; Ephesians 3:2a, 5-6; Matthew 2:1-12)

How do we react to heartbreak, disappointment and the disintegration of all that we hold dear? For many, the reaction is despair, cynicism and depression. The last few years have brought the world much heartbreak, disappointment and struggle. We may have experienced these things in our own lives as well. 

Published in Fr. Scott Lewis

Mary, the Holy Mother of God (Year A) Jan. 1 (Numbers 6:22-27; Psalm 67; Galatians 4:4-7; Luke 2:16-21)

The exodus from Egypt began well. In just a few words, God revealed His intentions and high hopes for Israel. The blessing that Aaron was to give to the people called for the care and protection of God as well as God’s graciousness and peace. 

Published in Fr. Scott Lewis

Nativity of the Lord (Year A) Dec. 25 (Isaiah 52:7-10; Psalm 98; Hebrews 1:1-6; John 1:1-18)

We all long for some good news for a change. Most are sick of the steady flow of darkness, pain and negativity that bombard us each day. What would it be like to hear some absolutely wonderful news? What would it be? 

Published in Fr. Scott Lewis

Fourth Sunday of Advent (Year A) Dec. 18 (Isaiah 7:10-14; Psalm 24; Romans 1:1-7; Matthew 1:18-24)

God, give me a sign! How often we may have wished and prayed fervently for a sign, especially when we were in a desperate situation. 

Published in Fr. Scott Lewis

Advent has always had a special importance to me, a type of monumental weight signalling what is unquestionably the most consequential moment for humanity: the arrival of Jesus. It is a time of waiting and preparation, marked by the gradual lighting of the candles on the Advent wreath.

Published in Register Columnists

Fr. Gabriele Amorth, SSP (1925-2016) was the chief exorcist of the Vatican and a member of the Society of St. Paul (one of the congregations founded by Blessed Fr. James Alberione). I had the privilege of interviewing Fr. Amorth in 2011, while filming a documentary on Fr. Alberione (MediaApostle.com). 

Published in Register Columnists

Vigilance is an essential part of the spiritual life because the devil will try to sneak in when one is not paying attention or, especially, when a Christian thinks he or she is making a lot of progress on the road to holiness, Pope Francis said.

Published in Reflections

Third Sunday of Advent (Year A) Dec. 11 (Isaiah 35:1-6a, 10; Psalm 146; James 5:7-10; Matthew 11:2-11)

Should we blame God for the dark and frightening state of the world? People tend to do that in one way or another. Either they blame God for “allowing” negative things to happen and then reject God, or they accuse God outright of being the perpetrator. 

Published in Fr. Scott Lewis

Second Sunday of Advent (Year A) Dec. 4 (Isaiah 11:1-10; Psalm 72; Romans 15:4-9; Matthew 3:1-12)

The prophecy from Isaiah does not describe anyone we have ever met, or the sort of person seen in the media. Although a descendant of King David, the figure seems to be from another world far above our own. He represents humanity’s hope and dream for millennia — someone who will put the world right. The saviour figure is one who is wise, just, righteous in judgment, incorruptible and filled with understanding and knowledge of God. 

Published in Fr. Scott Lewis

These are dangerously murky times. Passionate voices ring out all over; few listen to each other. We risk losing one another as forces pull and push us apart, like the sudden crush in a crowd, when people going different directions create forces by which some get suffocated and trampled. How can we find our way together amidst such forces?  

Published in Mary Marrocco