Features

At St. Oscar Romero Catholic Secondary School, students believe the true joy of Christmas is in sharing what you have. 

The Register Archive: The beauty of Bethlehem never ceases

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Bethlehem has seen many changes this past century, much of it due to the effects of war and an ever dwindling Christian population — but its drawing power never ceases, especially at this time of year. The grotto of the Church of the Nativity is the destination for many — the birthplace of Christ. It was the same 99 years ago, as reported in The Catholic Register of Dec. 25, 1919:


Companionship ministry makes Christmas season a little less lonely

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Christmas is the most wonderful time of the year, but for some it can be the loneliest. 

Brebéuf’s carol a long way from today’s version

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“The Huron Carol” you may have so enjoyed singing and listening to all these Christmases — well, it’s not the true words of St. Jean de Brébeuf’s you have been led to believe.

This is one bank built on gift of giving

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Christmas may come but once a year, but at the Furniture Bank they keep their eyes and ears open to the season year-round.

Medieval Christmas a time for feasting

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For your average serf of medieval Europe, Christmas was a pretty good deal, but not really a big deal.

The Register Archive: Church can still bask in the moonlight

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Canada’s David Saint-Jacques joined the exclusive club of space explorers when he blasted off to the International Space Station on Dec. 3, almost 46 years after NASA ended the Apollo program that put men on the moon. On Dec. 19, 1972, the last Apollo mission ended with the splashdown of the Apollo 17 capsule. It was an historic achievement, though by this time — after five previous moon landings in three years — the excitement of moon landings was waning. The last moon mission, however, held a deeper meaning for Fr. Harold O’Neill, who was a professor of dogmatic theology at St. Augustine’s Seminary in Toronto. At the time he wrote this for The Register, he was studying at the University of Regensburg in West Germany, where he drew inspiration from a lecture by Professor Joseph Ratzinger, who later became Pope Benedict XVI.


The Register Archives: A message of thanks for our new flag

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In the winter of 1964, Parliament was a hotbed of debate. With Canada’s 100th birthday just two-and-a-half years away, politicians were busily trying to come to some sort of agreement on a new national flag to replace the Red Ensign. The Great Canadian Flag Debate officially began in June 1964 and after six months of often bitter argument, it finally ended on Dec. 15, 1964 as the Liberals invoked closure, much to the chagrin of Conservative leader John Diefenbaker. Two months later, the new flag flew for the first time, prompting this letter to The Catholic Register editor from an unnamed seminarian at Toronto’s St. Augustine’s Seminary.

The Register Archives: Montreal massacre leaves legacy of pain

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Few events in recent Canadian history have had a greater impact than the massacre at École Polytechnique in Montreal. The gunman, Marc Lepine, killed 14 women and injured 14 others in the Dec. 6, 1989 attack before killing himself. His suicide note revealed his hatred of feminists. In the wake of the tragedy, there were changes to gun laws and the creation of an annual national day of remembrance on Dec. 6 to recognize violence against women. Five days following the attack, a funeral Mass for nine of the women was held at Montreal’s Notre Dame Basilica, as reported in The Register:

November 29, 2018

Toronto parish steps up for Panama World Youth Day pilgrims

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Alicia Escobar was 10 years old when Pope St. John Paul II came to Toronto in 2002 for World Youth Day. She was too young to participate but remembers the excitement, and now she’s looking forward to experiencing that for…

The Register Archive: Canada opens arms to Hungarian refugees

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Canada has had a long tradition of welcoming refugees looking to escape persecution. One of the most seminal events in that history came in the fall of 1956, when Hungarians revolted against their Communist rulers. They were met with a massive show of force as Soviet tanks rolled through the streets of Budapest and crushed the revolt within days. In early November, thousands of Hungarians began fleeing to Austria. Canada reacted quickly, providing swift approval of refugee claims and within a month they began arriving. Eventually Canada gave asylum to about 37,500 Hungarians and lent support in their first year in Canada. The majority were Roman Catholic, so it’s no surprise the Church played an important role dealing with the new arrivals as this Register story from the Dec. 8, 1956 illustrates.