News/International

The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington is one imposing pile. The largest Roman Catholic Church in the United States, it blends Romanesque, Byzantine and modern styles into a church truly conducive to prayer and worship. And some thoughtful introspection, as Pope Benedict XVI offered his American fellow bishops on April 16.

Of Vespers, incense and lapsed Catholics

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The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington is one imposing pile. The largest Roman Catholic Church in the United States, it blends Romanesque, Byzantine and modern styles into a church truly conducive to prayer and worship. And some thoughtful introspection, as Pope Benedict XVI offered his American fellow bishops on April 16.

They know how to throw a party

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The official welcome ceremony to Washington April 16 for Pope Benedict XVI on the lush south lawn of the White House was a colourful, even cheery, affair. It was full of music, marching bands, waving flags, kind words. Not to mention a spontaneous rendition of "Happy Birthday" for the Pope, who turned 81 that day.

They know how to throw a party

By

The official welcome ceremony to Washington April 16 for Pope Benedict XVI on the lush south lawn of the White House was a colourful, even cheery, affair. It was full of music, marching bands, waving flags, kind words. Not to mention a spontaneous rendition of "Happy Birthday" for the Pope, who turned 81 that day.

Americans greet the Pope with warmth and curiosity

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{mosimage}WASHINGTON - As Pope Benedict XVI arrived here for the first North American visit of his papacy, the greetings ranged from a love-in to the critical to the just plain curious.

In fact, as Benedict touched down at Andrews Airforce Base outside the capital at 4 p.m. April 15, his visit was the talk of the town. Some 5,000 journalists were here filling the airwaves with everything from speculation on what he would say to reviews of the place of the church in American society. Over the next five days, until the Pope's departure from New York City on April 20, they would dissect every one of his words.

A picture-perfect landing

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Pope Benedict XVI's "Shepherd One," an AlItalia flight from Rome, arrived just the way the cameras love. It was a bright, sunny, cloudless and slightly breezy day as the papal jet touched down on the runway at Andrew Airforce Base outside of Washington. And the crowd of 1,200 government officials, American Catholic prelates and assorted invited guests cheered.

A picture-perfect landing

By

Pope Benedict XVI's "Shepherd One," an AlItalia flight from Rome, arrived just the way the cameras love. It was a bright, sunny, cloudless and slightly breezy day as the papal jet touched down on the runway at Andrew Airforce Base outside of Washington. And the crowd of 1,200 government officials, American Catholic prelates and assorted invited guests cheered.

The hordes are here

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You know you're in Washington when you walk into a hotel and everyone around you works for the media. And they're here — in spades. Some 5,000 journalists have signed up to cover the visit of Pope Benedict XVI to the United States and, having nothing else to do but sit and wait for his arrival at Andrews Air Force base here in Washington at 4 p.m., we're keeping busy keeping the U.S. Secret Service busy.

The hordes are here

By
You know you're in Washington when you walk into a hotel and everyone around you works for the media. And they're here — in spades. Some 5,000 journalists have signed up to cover the visit of Pope Benedict XVI to the United States and, having nothing else to do but sit and wait for his arrival at Andrews Air Force base here in Washington at 4 p.m., we're keeping busy keeping the U.S. Secret Service busy.

And they'll know we are Catholics...

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That hoary old folk hymn said "they'll know we are Christians by our love." But how will they know we are Catholics? In modern secular society, Catholics fit right in. There are few visible signs they wear. Crucifixes are just as likely to be a fashion accessory as a statement of faith. But scratch a Catholic and you'll find a surprising amount of religious tradition.

And they'll know we are Catholics...

By

That hoary old folk hymn said "they'll know we are Christians by our love." But how will they know we are Catholics? In modern secular society, Catholics fit right in. There are few visible signs they wear. Crucifixes are just as likely to be a fashion accessory as a statement of faith. But scratch a Catholic and you'll find a surprising amount of religious tradition.