EDMONTON – When Frank Stempfle was born prematurely in a rural Alberta farmhouse on a winter day in 1926 he weighed just 2½ pounds. His father placed him in a shoebox near the oven to keep him warm, and the neighbours didn’t think he’d live.

Published in Canada
February 21, 2018

Editorial: A dynamic duo

Since his stunning decision five years ago to renounce the papacy, Pope Emeritus Benedict has been spent his time praying, reading, strolling, enjoying music and welcoming friends. He has stayed far from the Vatican limelight and, as he promised, clear of any words or deeds that might suggest even an inkling of interference in the work of his successor.

Published in Editorial

With the exception of scripture and a few Christian mystics, Christian spirituality, up to now, has been weak in presenting us with a vision for our retirement years.

Published in Fr. Ron Rolheiser

Calgary Bishop Fred Henry said he knew it was time to retire when his pain became constant and his posture became stooped to the point that “my feet are much more familiar to me than the sky.”

Published in Editorial

I have crossed paths with Bishop Frederick Henry for nearly 20 years on visits to my family in Calgary. He has always been kind to me, made me welcome in his diocese and I have enjoyed the occasions we have had time to talk.

Published in Fr. Raymond de Souza

VATICAN CITY – Retired Pope Benedict XVI said in an interview that he felt a "duty" to resign from the papacy because of his declining health and the rigorous demands of papal travel.

Published in Vatican

VATICAN CITY - Retired Pope Benedict XVI has never doubted or regretted his decision to resign, knowing it was the right thing to do for the good of the Church, said Archbishop Georg Ganswein, prefect of the papal household and personal secretary to the retired pope.

Published in Vatican

VATICAN CITY - On his last full day as Pope, Pope Benedict XVI delivered an unusually personal and emotional farewell address, thanking the faithful around the world for their support and assuring them that he would remain in their service even in retirement.

Published in International

York Catholic District School Board director of education Susan LaRosa has announced that she will retire when her contract expires on Dec. 31.

“Well you know I’ve been in the education business for 45 years and I’ve enjoyed every moment of it for sure,” said LaRosa. “I have a great prayer life and the Lord told me it’s time to use my skills in a different way and after 15 years I decided to retire.”

During her career as an educator LaRosa moved up through the ranks, from teacher to principal, superintendent and most recently director of education.

She became director of education during a difficult time for the York board. Changes introduced when the Mike Harris Tories were in power brought challenges to school boards across the province in the late 1990s, and with it labour unrest.

“As a director there are always challenges that come our way,” said LaRosa. “The most satisfying part is that we’ve always been able to stand side-by-side in all the challenges and come up with a win-win solution that kept people first. That to me is the most satisfying part of my experience as a director.”

Over the years she and her colleagues worked towards “re-culturing the board” by building stronger relationships between teachers, parents and other education stakeholders.

Her attitude towards building personal relationships is what led Elizabeth Crowe, chairperson of the board, to say that LaRosa redefined the three Rs to relationships, relationships and relationships.

“Her first mandate was to do some mending of fences with our employee group that resulted in some stability in the system,” said Crowe. “That success is founded on a respect for the professionalism of all employees, a welcoming atmosphere in our schools, recog- nition of the vital role of parents, priests and the community and a commitment to fostering all levels of student leadership.”

Although LaRosa will be missed by all trustees Crowe said the board is excited to work with a new director of education.

“She will be missed but at the same time we are excited and looking forward to working with the new director of education,” said Crowe. “Over the years we’ve developed a friendship at a certain level; I wish her all the best and I know that all the other trustees feel the same way. She has always been able to see the big picture and she has always been open to working with trustees and understanding the political atmosphere that we work in.

“As chair she has made my life easy because she has been able to see that part of the educational system and she respects that.”

Since becoming the director of education LaRosa has been recognized for her dedicated work many times including with an Administrator of the Year Award from Niagara University’s College of Education, the President’s Award from The Council of Exceptional Children of York Region and in May 2009 she received The Learning Partnership’s Champion of Education Award.

Now in the homestretch of her career, LaRosa said she plans to remain an active member of the community.

“I have way too much energy to fully retire so I would like to perhaps pick and choose where I can use my talents and have not such a hectic schedule,” she said.

Her successor has yet to be named.

Published in Canada: Toronto-GTA

Comment

francis mccarrick besties

Charles Lewis: The papal office deserves a defence 

"I believed that criticism of the papacy was a sport for non-Catholics or perhaps disgruntled Catholics who were always at odds with Church teachings. Then a few things happened," Charles Lewis writes.

Faith

Pope's homily

pope francis homily abuse satan
Read the latest homily given by Pope Francis.

Features