Joshua Santos, The Catholic Register

Joshua Santos, The Catholic Register

Thousands of first-time voters — including many young people born in this century — will head to the polls in the Oct. 21 federal election, along with millennials who make up Canada’s biggest voting bloc.

It’s called the altar servers club, but the title doesn’t begin to describe its role and impact at Toronto’s Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish.

When Heidi Lee speaks, the young women at Sancta Maria House listen.

 

Tens of thousands of people in Toronto joined more than 80 other youth-led marches across Canada on Sept. 27 to demand immediate action to address global climate change.

When he was 10, Fr. Thomas Tou was unhappy when his family earmarked him for the priesthood by enrolling him in a minor seminary in northeast China.

From teens climbing onto the roof to drug use in the parking lot to amorous couples on church lawns, Fr. Carlos Augusto Sierra Tobon has had enough. 

There will be some much younger faces within the walls of St. Marguerite d’Youville Catholic School in Whitby after its re-build is complete.

Fr. Paul Hansen has worked in plenty of dangerous places in his missionary work, always following one simple rule:

“I would never tell my mother, when she was alive, where I was going until I came home and I told her where I was. Because she wouldn’t sleep,” said the native of Saint John, N.B., who has done social justice work in 82 countries, including the Middle East and the former Soviet Union.

Benjamin Turland has become a prominent figure for Catholic youth over the years, but it wasn’t always that way. 

After four days of meetings in Rome with fellow youth leaders from around the world, Canada’s representatives returned with at least one overriding lesson: There’s a lot of work to do.

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