Canada has had a long tradition of welcoming refugees looking to escape persecution. One of the most seminal events in that history came in the fall of 1956, when Hungarians revolted against their Communist rulers. They were met with a massive show of force as Soviet tanks rolled through the streets of Budapest and crushed the revolt within days. In early November, thousands of Hungarians began fleeing to Austria. Canada reacted quickly, providing swift approval of refugee claims and within a month they began arriving. Eventually Canada gave asylum to about 37,500 Hungarians and lent support in their first year in Canada. The majority were Roman Catholic, so it’s no surprise the Church played an important role dealing with the new arrivals as this Register story from the Dec. 8, 1956 illustrates. 


Published in Features

Louis Riel and his legacy in our nation’s history are well-documented, if not a bit fragmented.

Published in Canada

I love my Church, but I admit I have at times found it difficult dealing with its sins against the Indigenous community.

Published in YSN: Speaking Out
QUEBEC CITY – Churches of the Archdiocese of Sherbrooke will join those of other churches across Canada and ring their bells 100 times Nov. 11 to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I.
Published in Canada
It’s always fun to pick up a book and have trouble putting it down because the story grips you.
Published in Register Columnists

Homegrown Canadian Christmas carols go way beyond SCTV’s Bob and Doug McKenzie’s interpretation of “The 12 Days of Christmas,” the Rovers’ “Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer” and, for some of a certain vintage, the novelty song “Honky the Christmas Goose” sung by Toronto Maple Leafs legend Johnny Bower.

Published in Features
On Christmas Eve during the Klondike gold rush, three young miners found an unexpected treasure more valuable than gold dust, and their chivalry is worth remembering 120 Christmases later.
Published in Robert Brehl

As Canada reflects on its 150 years of Confederation, Fr. Raymond de Souza has dug a little deeper to unearth the Catholic perspective on the story behind the history.

Published in Youth Speak News

OTTAWA – Newly released digital inventories of Vatican documents have revealed fresh insights into Canadian history, but don’t expect the kind of dramatic revelations that would fill a Dan Brown mystery novel, says an Italian specialist.

Published in Canada

I realize it isn’t everybody’s ticket to dreamland. Indeed, I can think of many for whom it would constitute unmitigated boredom and misery. But if you’ve got some sort of semblance of faith or an interest in early Canadian history or an aesthetic love for religious architecture and art (or a galloping case of all three), then a pilgrimage to the Catholic shrines of Quebec can make for a wonderfully stimulating holiday.

Published in Arts News