Every few years I get the opportunity to visit my grandparents’ cabin in the small town of Hope, B.C. Just a few hours from Vancouver, the cabin itself may not seem like much to the average citizen, but to my relatives and myself it is a reflection of hard work, perseverance, fond memories and family.

Life is for living

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I just finished reading Jodi Picoult’s The Pact and felt that it really hit home hard. Although it’s fiction, it dealt with real issues teenagers face every day.

Life is for living

By
I just finished reading Jodi Picoult’s The Pact and felt that it really hit home hard. Although it’s fiction, it dealt with real issues teenagers face every day.

Be careful with the words you choose

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OMG. This tiny, seemingly harmless acronym is just one variation of a phrase that has invaded our everyday lives, from conversation to television scripting to instant messaging.

We need to have respect for all

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As I was sitting in on a group discussion, the topic of same-sex relationships arose. The majority of people in the discussion were Catholic and all had pretty strong opinions on the subject. This is to be expected, though what is not to be expected was some of the rude and hurtful comments I heard in that conversation. The fact that someone I know is gay was sitting right beside me made the whole experience that much worse.

Mingled minorities

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When I was three years old, I was unable to organize my thoughts and speak either French or English. My dad spoke to my brother and me only in French. My mom spoke to us in English.

Making the leap with faith

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My friends and family in the audience, the lights brightly shining on my face, my classmates all watching attentively as I walk across the stage to receive my high school diploma. I feel a sense of accomplishment, a rush of gratitude and much uncertainty of the unknown. I shake hands and walk back to my seat, wondering what God has in store for me.

Happiness and the simple life

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TORONTO - I was walking along Queen Street in downtown Toronto with my friend and dwelling on the fact that I had flooded the entire grocery store where I work by leaving the produce hose on. I was scared about what I had to face the next day at work and upset that I made such a careless mistake.

Go to church? Are you kidding!

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Having just finished four years of university, I know a thing or two about working on Sundays. Often, I would give myself time to sleep in, sleep off a week of classes, tutorials, assignments and incredibly late nights, but then it was time to get up and at ’em for a long day of work. For many young people, church is not even a thought worth entertaining during the school year. “Are you kidding? I have four essays and two presentations to finish by Thursday!”

 

Phony satisfaction

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I can remember many times where a cell phone has gone off at the wrong time, but there was this one time I’ll never forget. I was at Palm Sunday Mass and a cell phone rang right in the middle of it. I couldn’t believe it. The person didn’t even turn the phone off because he didn’t want anyone to know it was him.  He had not only disrespected the people around him, the priest and the altar servers, but most importantly, God.

Shortcuts lead to dead ends

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I  was 18 years old when I competed in a regional lifeguard competition. My boss agreed to pay us to compete. However, days before the competition, we were practising for several hours and my teammates were signing in at work for their practice hours. They knew that it was wrong, but they did it anyway. I was jealous because they were making money and I wasn’t so I signed in too, thinking “if I get caught, we’ll all get caught.” Our manager never noticed what happened and we got away with stealing.