Youth Speak News

{mosimage}TORONTO - It was the mother of all pep rallies. Eight thousand tweens and teens crammed into Ricoh Stadium on Toronto’s waterfront Oct. 17, not to stoke school spirit but to embolden young people to go out and try to make the world a better place.

A tall order, no matter how old or young you are. But if the energy level of these young people is any indication, they appear, thankfully, to be up to the task.

The Author of life

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Life is a storybook. God is the author and man is His character. I realized this as I read my Writer’s Workshop book for creative writing class.

A few weeks ago, I had to read a chapter on time which spoke about how the author of a story controls the pace of time. The author transcends time. I kept pondering this element until it made me think about God, the author of life.

Youth ministry: grasping the challenge

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{mosimage}TORONTO - As a leader in Catholic youth ministry for nine years, Melissa Delaney knows the challenges of the trade firsthand.

Now a part-time youth minister at Holy Redeemer parish in Kanata, Ont., Delaney says one of the nagging issues for people working with youth has always been getting across the importance of the ministry.

Altar servers honoured

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{mosimage}TORONTO - More than 600 people attended the 25th Cardinal Carter Altar Server Awards ceremony and Mass at St. Paul’s Basilica on Oct. 11.

It was the first time that the ceremony, sponsored by the Serra Clubs of Toronto, was held outside St. Michael’s Cathedral.

Private school to move into rectory

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{mosimage}SAINT JOHN, N.B. - After five successful years, Divine Mercy Catholic School in Saint John is getting ready to move its small family of 80 students into a much-needed larger home in the renovated rectory of St. Peter’s Church.

In 2000, a group of Catholic families decided to form a faith-based private school for their children. There was not a single private Catholic school in all of New Brunswick at the time, and even now Divine Mercy is only one of two in the province.

Science: merely a tool to use

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If I were to tell you that dust from the moon could cure the common cold, you might laugh or tell me I was crazy. But what if I said that scientists had tested the healing capabilities of moon dust and found their human subjects showed improvement in a matter of hours? Better yet, what if I showed you the article in a science magazine?

No such article exists, by the way. However, as soon as I placed the word “scientists” in front of my moon dust tale, I don’t doubt that some discerning minds said “I still don’t believe it.” But more often than not, if someone makes a claim in the name of science, we, as a culture, are more apt to give it at least some merit.

Leafy lifestyle, according to Genesis

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I often find myself explaining to people why I’m a vegetarian. I used to be pretty defensive about it, but now I realize I only want to educate others.

The drive behind my vegetarianism is certainly not limited to my compassionate and “tree-hugging” nature, though this is one of the reasons I chose to adopt my leafy lifestyle. Health benefits, economic efficiency and conscious consumption are all contributing factors, but people need to understand that my faith plays a role in this too.

Jesus action figure mocks Christians

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{mosimage}VICTORIA, B.C. - A Jesus Christ action figure sold at Camosun College’s bookstore is generating mixed reaction among students and members of the Victoria community.

While the bookstore insists its intention is to educate and not to take a religious or political stance, some students say that regardless of intention, the product is inappropriate in a college context.

Peddling to the Pope

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{mosimage}Months before thousands of youth landed in Sydney, Australia, for World Youth Day in July, two Canadians were already peddling their way to the Pope.

Frank Callaghan, 20, and Brendan Quigley, 19, from Peterborough, Ont., boarded their bicycles May 17 to begin a 50-day pilgrimage of about 4,300 km from Perth to Sydney.

Students prepare to cast their vote

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{mosimage}TORONTO - As the federal election approaches, students cannot help but think about how their input will affect the way our government will run.

Julian Noble, an eager first-time voter and student at the University of Toronto, said it is important for him to know what a politician stands for.

Using the senses to appreciate

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{mosimage}Recently in one of my classes, I was forced to use my rusty senses to study and observe the common strawberry. Sounds pretty simple right? However, the catch was that I could not use my “taste” senses until last — pretty hard to do when I was participating on an empty stomach.

I must admit I never truly appreciated a strawberry until that moment. By taking the time to observe my “subject,” as we were required to write about it afterwards, I was able to feel the bumpy texture and the fragility of the strawberry’s “skin.” I was able to imagine the delectable flavour by its smell — something a hundred times better than any strawberry flavoured lip-gloss or perfume.