WINNIPEG - Carmela Finkel remembers feeling terrified.

Simply Merton: Wisdom from his Journals, by Linus Mundy, (Franciscan Media, 138 pages, $16.00) 

The Trappist monk and prolific writer Thomas Merton once spoke of the “Joyce Industry” in a particularly insightful essay on several books about the eminent Irish literary giant. Little did he know that in a short span there would be a “Merton Industry,” an industry which appears to offer no sign of waning. 

I was chagrined, but not entirely surprised, when I read Woody Allen’s recent ruminations on ultimate things. To be blunt, he could not be any bleaker regarding the issue of meaning in the universe. 

TORONTO - My Brother’s Vows gives us the story of siblings who are running — one towards the Catholic Church and the other away from it. 

Robert Blair Kaiser’s analysis of what makes Pope Francis tick is a wonderful read and to be promoted. But it’s not what I was expecting.

Genius looks like Bob “Coach Lad” Ladouceur, who led the De La Salle High School Spartans into the football history books.

Crimes Against My Brother by David Adams Richards (Doubleday Canada, hardcover, 416 pages, $32.95).

David Adams Richards is a writer who knows the human soul and reveals it to us in dialogue, plot and inner reflection. It’s the author’s extraordinary access to the truth of being human that makes us care about his characters. We know them, and what brings them joy, pain, hope, despair, guilt and peace matters to us.

Depicting a society in which every aspect of daily life is state-controlled — even birth and death — The Giver takes moviegoers on a journey from childhood naiveté to the harsh realities of shattered innocence.

Although evangelical moviemakers have been in the spotlight lately with features such as Son of God and God’s Not Dead, at least one other prominent, mainstream director is also turning — or returning — to religion.

When you walk the Camino de Santiago, what you think will be hard is easy and what you think will be easy is hard. That's the advice Annie O'Neil gives after embarking on the 805-km pilgrimage known as the Camino Francés from St. Jean Pied de Port, France, to Santiago, Spain, the most popular of the Way of St. James.