Sport is a pervasive phenomenon of 21st-century culture. Therefore, asked the Vatican, “how could the Church not be interested?”

Last month Pope Francis had Catholics worldwide scratching their heads after he seemed to suggest German bishops would have his blessing if they reached a group consensus to circumvent Church teaching and make it easier for some Protestants to receive Communion.

Pope Francis often cozies up to young admirers as they raise their smartphones to snap selfies.  But it seems he may be having second thoughts about humouring the selfie generation.

They are desperate, poor and usually forgotten until violence erupts and the world takes note of them burying their dead.

As spring turns into summer, Canada is about to face a test of its generosity.

Maybe they didn’t get the memo. Maybe it was simple human error. Maybe they simply don’t care.

Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good. 

Canadian bishops must not have seen the hornets nest they were stepping into March 28 when they issued a somewhat ambiguously worded letter to Canada’s Indigenous peoples. 

Here we go again. Development and Peace, an organization created by Canada’s bishops, is back on the hot seat over allegations it failed to properly screen some overseas partners. At least 11 dioceses have withheld funds from the organization after suggestions that several of its partner agencies are offside on issues that include abortion, contraception and gender theory. 

In his report on the crisis in Myanmar, Canada’s special envoy to the region fell short of labelling Rohingya persecution a genocide. But that detail should not stop Canada from acting as if it is one.

The Catholic relationship with Canada’s Indigenous peoples no doubt wobbled with the announcement that Pope Francis is not coming here to offer the apology so explicitly called for by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. After so much suffering, it could hardly be otherwise.