One of the most contentious debates involving Church figures of the 20th century involves the actions of Pope Pius XII during World War II. 

The immediate reaction to the mid-February news that Australian Cardinal George Pell was found guilty of sexually abusing two 13-year-old choir boys was that, in addition to any sentence the courts pronounce, the Vatican should move quickly to expel him from the priesthood.

The remarkable summit on sex abuse has ended but its work is far from done.

As the saying goes, no news is good news.

The much-anticipated Vatican summit on clerical sexual abuse of minors is still days away but perhaps the strongest declaration to be expected from this unprecedented gathering of bishops has already been made.

Ban the nukes

Re: Churches want action on nuclear treaty (Jan. 27):

It’s safe to say that nuclear weapons now pose the greatest threat to humanity. Rising tensions between major powers have increased the danger of a nuclear war that could end human civilization. The United States and Russia alone possess 90 per cent of the world’s nuclear arms. 

Of the thousands of words spoken last month inside a Saskatchewan courtroom, none were more profound than this simple declaration: I forgive you.

Trump bashers

What is happening to The Catholic Register? It used to report about Catholic Canadian values. Now it consistently bashes Donald Trump. Trump is not perfect, but which politician is? However, he is pro-life. Because of his pro-life belief, the tide may be turning in the United States. Millions of children can be saved.

Young people are not the future of the Church — they are the present.

End all persecution

Re: Persecution hits close to home (Jan. 13):

Bob Brehl states “we can go on and on about the persecutions of Christians around the world,” then abruptly switches to a story from The New York Times which discusses the homosexual individual from a Catholic San Diego parish who was harassed. Am I the only one who sees a disconnect? 

Canada’s bishops have listened for years as frustrated Church leaders in the developing world decry Canadian companies for acting as if the worker codes and human rights mandated by Canadian law become optional when operating abroad.