As someone who — thanks to his mother’s birth in Scotland and her emigration to Canada — enjoys both British and Canadian citizenship, never have I felt more of a “resident alien” living in the United States than when it comes to the issue of guns and the so-called right to bear arms which gets invoked after every atrocity, such as the Aug. 31 shootings that left seven dead in Odessa, Texas.

Is secularism good or bad?  

Canadians of faith are struggling with that question these days.  Our increasingly secularized world seems intent on removing religion from public life.  

Recently I read a wonderful LinkedIn entry by Aron Laxton about the U.S. Navy’s efforts to study and reinforce aircraft based on planes that had been damaged from the front. Engineers studied and mapped the bullet holes that peppered the “wounded” planes and determined that additional armour needed to be added to the wingtips and to the central body of the aircraft. 

Repentance

The Aug. 25 photograph of the return of the cross to Nagasaki Cathedral should be the first act of setting right the wrong of the bombing of Nagasaki on Aug. 9, 1945. 

An old adage in development work is the dictum, “Give a person a fish, and you will feed her for one day; teach her how to fish, and you will feed her for a lifetime.” 

When the Amazon suffers, the world suffers.

Over the Labour Day weekend, there sure were a lot of U.S. politicians conveying their “thoughts and prayers” for the victims and their families of the latest mass shooting, but no visible action on doing anything about the American gun epidemic.

It’s a brilliant example of the power of persistent, passionate prayer and how speaking the truth in love can cause hearts to do a 180-degree turn.

Weather was at the front of my minds as I headed out to the lake this summer with four kids in tow while my husband was away working. 

Anti-Christian bias

Re: “Report keeps Jesuit off monument pedestal” (Aug. 11-18):

Parks Canada, members of two Indigenous groups and others say that the positioning of figures on the Champlain monument in Orillia is “racist.” They’ve now decided to make changes to it including removing a Jesuit figure as an “example of reconciliation.” 

The top executives from 181 of the richest corporations in America recently signed a one-page document on business ethics that could have been penned by the Pope.