Is our freedom absolute? If God is perfectly free, and we bear His image and likeness, are we not then perfectly free?

The Canadian Human Rights Commission insists it has never called Christmas racist.

Regarding Quinton Amundson’s article on the book Persecuted Within, and further to the editor’s comment to the Nov. 26 Letter of the Week, I was shocked that our Catholic paper would include such content.

In Health Canada’s latest voluminous annual report on Canadian MAiD’s “evolution” to world-leading status, the minister in charge highlights Ottawa’s commitment to “culturally safe” medicalized killing of Indigenous peoples.

Pope Francis’ message to participants in the 13th festival  of the Social Doctrine of the Church.

Why would The Catholic Register publish the article “Changing journey along synodal path” about Fr. Tom Rosica’s views on the October Synod of Bishops? 

The Canadian Human Rights Commission must at least log marks for audacity by attacking Christmas and Easter as “obvious examples” of religious intolerance following the Oct. 7 Hamas hate slaughter in Israel. Even in the wake of the most barbaric outbreak of religious “intolerance” afflicted on Jews since the Holocaust, after all, the CHRC created a media flutter with its recent “Discussion Paper on Religious Intolerance.” To do so, it singled out the two main Christian holidays as prime causes of “present day systemic religious discrimination.”

It all started with a call from a friend. “Would you be able to meet with a relative of mine who is sleeping rough on the streets and into drugs?” I said that if he was willing, I would meet with him. We arranged to meet at “Ripples of Kindness,” the outreach program run out of Sacre Coeur Parish in downtown Toronto. Little did I know that the meeting would lead me deep into the Rock ’n’ Roll scene of the ’80s and ’90s.

It’s a condition that increases the risk of heart disease by 29 per cent, strokes by 32 per cent and premature death by 26 per cent. It has the same effect on the body as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. People with this condition are more likely to catch viruses, contract respiratory illnesses and develop dementia, among many other ills.

I suppose I am one of the young, old. In January I will turn 65, and officially become a senior citizen.  Not long ago I spent a weekend with an old friend. During an evening of wonderful conversation he said, “you know Harry, we are in the prime of the rest of our lives.”  I thought his comment was noteworthy, so I wrote it down.

There he stood. Alone. Vulnerable. Attired as a Prince of the Church wielding spiritual power, he was unprotected from the risks of downtown Toronto street life.