As flames engulfed Notre-Dame Cathedral, threatening to destroy a Paris treasure that for 850 years withstood revolutions, wars and natural disasters, dazed crowds formed impromptu vigils on nearby streets. They prayed, they cried, they sang Ave Maria’s.

Healing was not the invitation I was expecting when I showed up at church several weeks ago. 

A week before celebrating the Resurrection, we had the resurrection of Resurrection.

Belief in the bodily resurrection from the dead of the crucified Christ is the core of Christian faith. St. Paul stated the point succinctly: “If Christ had not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins” (1 Corinthians 15:17).

Indeed, the importance of the Resurrection goes further than that. The empty tomb reveals that the Resurrection is not a testimony to the immortality of the soul or to a “spiritual” rising in which Christ’s spirit lives in His followers while His body decays in the ground. As well, the rational grounds for belief in the Resurrection are evidence that faith is not blind or irrational.

Alleluia, alleluia give thanks to the risen Lord Alleluia, alleluia give praise to His name.

The music had barely faded from our Easter liturgy when I walked into the hospital room of a woman I had been asked to visit but had never met.

No shame

Re: Windsor hospital in bubble zone battle (Mar. 24):

The organization Feminists for Action is quoted as not wanting to be “shamed” by pro-lifers. How could they be shamed when not doing anything shameful?

It has been a year of shame and humiliation for the Church. The clerical abuse scandals have scarred thousands of victims and mortified the faithful worldwide. They have also spurred appeals for repentance and renewal, appeals that are appropriate at Easter.

The excitement surrounding Tiger Woods’ historic win at the Masters golf tournament is undeniable, but it also raises some questions.

For a number of years there was a panhandler standing outside St. Michael’s Cathedral in downtown Toronto. His name was Francis. I liked him quite a bit. Which should not be thought of as a given since there are some panhandlers who, over the years, have gotten on my nerves. I know it is not a Christian thing to say but there it is.

Discrimination

Quebec’s Bill 21, which bans the wearing/display of religious symbols to those employed in “positions of authority,” is an absolute abomination and outright display of racial and religious intolerance.

Vaccinating young children against a wide range of diseases is a medical and moral imperative, and a smart practice parents should embrace.