Deborah Gyapong, Canadian Catholic News

Deborah Gyapong, Canadian Catholic News

Deborah Waters Gyapong has been a journalist and novelist for more than 20 years. She has worked in print, radio and television, including 12 years as a producer for CBC TV's news and current affairs programming. She currently covers religion and politics primarily for Catholic and Evangelical newspapers.

OTTAWA – The pro-life movement is not going away despite “bubble zones,” advocates vowed on the first day of Ontario’s new law against protests outside abortion clincs.
OTTAWA – A government report on religious discrimination has overlooked Ottawa’s own failings, including its conduct in the Canada Summer Jobs controversy, according to the president of the Catholic Civil Rights League.

OTTAWA – A Toronto pro-life group has failed to get an injunction against the pro-abortion attestation required in the Canada Summer Jobs application.

OTTAWA – Thirty years after Canada’s abortion law was struck down, Catholic bishops and pro-life groups are as determined as ever to battle for the protection of unborn human life.
OTTAWA – As opposition mounts against a required pro-abortion attestation in the Canada Summer Jobs application, Employment Minister Patty Hajdu is still hoping faith groups will apply.

OTTAWA – Catholic dioceses are recommending employers not sign the required pro-abortion attestation in applying for a Canada Summer Jobs (CSJ) grant.

OTTAWA – Despite escalating opposition from a growing array of charities and faith groups, the Liberal government is not backing down on demands that Canada Summer Jobs applicants sign a pro-abortion attestation.

Canada’s charities are weighing their response to the Canada Summer Jobs policy change that requires an attestation their organization’s core mandate supports abortion.

OTTAWA – Pro-life advocates are making plans to address a new law in Ontario that will create “bubble zones” around abortion facilities and likely force the National March for Life in Ottawa to find a new route.

OTTAWA – As the new year dawns, the prospect of a peaceful future for Christians in the Middle East seems as remote as ever.