Fr. Scott Lewis, S.J

Fr. Scott Lewis, S.J

Fr. Scott Lewis is an associate professor of New Testament at Regis College, a founding member of the Toronto School of Theology.

He is a past president of the Canadian Catholic Biblical Association.

Resurrection of the Lord, April 4 (Year B) Acts 10:34a, 37-43; Psalm 118; Colossians 3:1-4; John 20:1-18

Peter had quite a story to tell as he stood before the elders in Jerusalem. He related the ministry of Jesus, who had been anointed with the power of the Spirit by God. His ministry was uncomplicated — doing good and healing people. That should not have been problematic, but it was.

Passion (Palm) Sunday, March 28 (Year B) Isaiah 50:4-7; Psalm 22; Philippians 2:6-11; Mark 14:1-15:47

Words can wound or heal, tear down or build up, strengthen or weaken and give hope or break spirits. Everything depends on what is spoken and the manner in which is delivered. It has nothing to do with eloquence or rhetorical skill. The words must be suitable to the person and situation and delivered with care and compassion.

Fifth Sunday of Lent, March 21 (Year B) Jeremiah 31:31-34; Psalm 51; Hebrews 5:7-9; John 12:20-33

God gave both bad news and good news to the people of Israel.

Fourth Sunday of Lent, March 14 (Year B) 2 Chronicles 36:14-17a, 19-23; Psalm 137; Ephesians 2:4-10; John 3:14-21

There is a pattern that is often repeated in the narratives of the Old Testament. The people of God fall into sin that is marked by idolatry, corruption and injustice. God sends prophets to warn them and turn their hearts back to the Lord. The warnings are usually ignored and then followed by disaster for the nation, usually at the hands of an oppressor.

Third Sunday of Lent, March 7 (Year B) Exodus 20:1-17; Psalm 19; 1 Corinthians 1:18, 22-25 John 2:13-25

Are the Ten Commandments unique? Were people ignorant of their content before Moses ascended Mount Sinai to receive them from God? In fact, many of the provisions of the commandments have parallels in the law codes of the ancient near east. They represent the basic building blocks of a just and humane society.

Second Sunday of Lent, Feb. 28 (Year B) Genesis 22:1-2, 9-13, 15-18; Psalm 116; Romans 8:31b-35, 37; Mark 9:2-10

The story of the sacrifice of Isaac is one of the most puzzling, difficult and potentially dangerous passages in the Bible. It should make us all ask some important questions: Did God actually ask this of Abraham, and if so, what does that say about God?

First Sunday of Lent, Feb. 21 (Year B) Genesis 9:8-15; Psalm 25; 1 Peter 3:18-22; Mark 1:12-15

Sometimes the first attempt at a project fails. God created humans and all other living beings so that they could fill and subdue the Earth. But it did not go well. Violence and evil spread like a contagion following the expulsion from the garden of Eden and the murder of Abel at the hands of his brother Cain.

Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Feb. 14 (Year B) Leviticus 13:1-2, 45-46; Psalm 32; 1 Corinthians 10:31-11:1; Mark 1:40-45

Fear can be the most impenetrable barrier in the world, far surpassing any fortress or wall built by humans. Fear is strongest when people feel that their well-being and safety is being threatened.

Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Feb. 7 (Year B) Job 7:1-4, 6-7; Psalm 147; 1 Corinthians 9:16-19, 22-23; Mark 1:29-39

Our perception of time depends a lot on our experience. When we are successful, happy, fulfilled and loved, time is swift indeed. It seems as if the party is over all too soon and we are reluctant to move on. But what about our experience of time when life is a gruelling and painful burden?

Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Jan. 31 (Year B) Deuteronomy 18:15-20; Psalm 95; 1 Corinthians 7:32-35; Mark 1:21-28

What happens when a great prophetic figure passes from this Earth? Who takes their place and how do people once again hear the voice of God?