Fr. Scott Lewis, S.J

Fr. Scott Lewis, S.J

Fr. Scott Lewis is an associate professor of New Testament at Regis College, a founding member of the Toronto School of Theology.

He is a past president of the Canadian Catholic Biblical Association.

Second Sunday of Easter (Year C) April 24 (Acts 5:12-16; Psalm 118; Revelation 1:9-11a, 12-13, 17-19; John 20:19-31)

The people of Jerusalem must have sensed and felt the power emanating from the group of Jesus believers gathered in Solomon’s Portico. Many wanted to join them but were hesitant or afraid — it all seemed so strange and new. And yet many did join them, and their numbers continued to grow.

Resurrection of the Lord (Year C) April 17 (Acts 10:34a, 37-43; Psalm 118; Colossians 3:1-4; John 20:1-18)

The message that the apostle Peter preached after the Resurrection was short but powerful. He stuck to the facts, relating the many good things that Jesus had done and the souls He had helped. More importantly, Jesus was empowered by the Spirit and God was with Him.

Passion (Palm) Sunday (Year C) April 10(Isaiah 50:4-7; Psalm 22; Philippians 2:6-11; Luke 22:14-23:56)

There is no lack of people or groups who feel that they have a duty and calling to loudly proclaim their beliefs. It often seems like we are being bombarded from all sides by very shrill, intolerant and angry voices. What is to distinguish them from the prophet described in Isaiah? Just one more voice?

Fifth Sunday of Lent (Year C) April 3 (Isaiah 43:16-21; Psalm 126; Philippians 3:8-14; John 8:1-11)

God can and does act in surprising and even shocking ways and cannot be confined by dogmatic formulas or learned treatises. Did calling one individual — Abraham — and staking everything on his fidelity make sense? Who would have ever predicted or reasoned the burning bush, the plagues of Egypt, the exodus, the giving of the commandments on Sinai and the entrance into the Promised Land?

Fourth Sunday of Lent, March 27 (Year C) Joshua 5:9a, 10-12; Psalm 34; 2 Corinthians 5:7-21; Luke 5:1-3, 22-32

The journey of the Israelites to the promised land should have taken a few months, but it stretched into 40 years.

Third Sunday of Lent, March 20 (Year C) Exodus 3:1-8a, 13-15; Psalm 103; 1 Corinthians 10:1-6, 10-12; Luke 13:1-9

After his flight from Egypt, Moses had settled down to a quiet life as a shepherd, but God had other plans for him.

Second Sunday of Lent, March 13 (Year C) Genesis 1 5:5-12, 17-18; Psalm 27; Philippians 3:17-4:1; Luke 9:28b-36

Covenants were serious affairs in the ancient world and were sealed in blood. God had promised Abram (he had not received his name change yet) land and many descendants. He would become the father of a great nation. God told him that his descendants would be more numerous than the stars in the sky.

First Sunday of Lent (Year C) March 6 (Deuteronomy 26:4-10; Psalm 91; Romans 10:8-13; Luke 4:1-13)

What is the proper attitude for the beginning of the Lenten journey? The reflex response would be “repentance” but we might ask if there is a response that is deeper and more helpful.

Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Feb. 27 (Sirach 27:4-7; Psalm 92; 1 Corinthians 15:54-58; Luke 6:39-45)

The four verses from Sirach may be short, but they pack quite a punch. The words that come from our mouths reveal more about us than we will ever know. This is one of the many reasons that the people of Israel took such care in what they uttered.

Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Feb. 20 (1 Samuel 26:2. 7-9, 12-13, 22-25; Psalm 103; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49; Luke 6:27-38)

Having our enemy right where we want them can be a consoling and satisfying thought. Perhaps they have hurt us or done great harm to us—- who can blame us for wanting to get even?