Fr. Scott Lewis is an associate professor of New Testament at Regis College, a founding member of the Toronto School of Theology.

He is a past president of the Canadian Catholic Biblical Association.

2nd Sunday of Advent Dec. 4 (Year A) Isaiah 11:1-10; Psalm 72; Romans 15:4-9; Matthew 3:1-12

Today’s warning signs are a call to action

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1st Sunday of Advent Nov. 27 (Year A) Isaiah 2:1-5; Psalm 122; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

The passage from Isaiah is one of the most stirring and inspiring images in the Bible. It represents humanity’s deep yearning for peace, happiness and prosperity, as well as an intimate knowledge of the ways of God.

Let God’s power of love be our guide

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Christ the King Nov. 20 (Year C) 2 Samuel 5:1-3; Psalm 122; Colossians 1:12-20; Luke 23:35-43

Walking God’s path leaves nothing to fear

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33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Nov. 13 (Malachi 4:1-2; Psalm 98; 2 Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21:5-19)

Most people love to see the “bad guys” get what they deserve. There is something very satisfying about seeing a villain’s evil deeds finally catch up with him.

The power of spiritual principles

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32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Nov. 6 (2 Maccabees 7:1-2, 7, 9-14; Psalm 17; 2 Thessalonians 2:16-3:5; Luke 20:27-38

How should we react when negative events shake us to our core and raise doubts?

Mercy will put you on the path to God

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31st Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Oct. 30 (Wisdom 11:23-12:2; Psalm 145; 2 Thessalonians 1:11-2:2; Luke 19:1-10)

It is easy to feel insignificant while gazing up at a starry night or looking at photos of countless galaxies taken from the Hubble telescope. We could come away with the feeling that we don’t count for much.

Leave judgment to God

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30th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Oct. 23 (Sirach 35:15-17, 20-22; Psalm 34; 2 Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18; Luke 18:9-14)

The world is not always a fair place. So often justice eludes us, especially when greed, special interests and prejudice enter the picture. Human beings often make poor judges, swayed as they are by so many things. Even on a personal level, people frequently pass judgment on others.

Through persistence, prayers will be heard

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29th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Oct. 16 (Exodus 17:8-13; Psalm 121; 2 Timothy 3:14-4:2; Luke 18:1-8)

Good leadership is essential in all human endeavours, whether in war, business or politics. The qualities of a leader can make or break any battle or collective activity. During the battle with the Amalekites, Moses stood on a hill with his lieutenants where he could be easily seen by his troops. His raised arms gave them courage — in their own minds, he was imparting some sort of blessing or power. They felt reassured that God was with them. As long as his arms remained raised, the Israelites prevailed; when Moses’ arms drooped, they began to lose ground.

Gratitude unlocks gates to mercy

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28th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Oct. 9 (2 Kings 5:14-17; Psalm 98; 2 Timothy 2:8-13; Luke 17:11-19)

It is often said that we imagine God in our own image and likeness. We think that God shares our likes and dislikes, hatreds and loves, opinions and way of looking at the world. God might even belong to our favourite political party or social class. Throughout the two biblical testaments, God repeatedly demonstrates that this is just not so. God shocks people by violating their opinions and prejudices, and by doing what is unexpected and distressing.

The righteous person lives by faith

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27th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Oct. 2 (Habakkuk 1:2-3; 2:2-4; Psalm 95; 2 Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14; Luke 17:5-10)

Habakkuk could have been written yesterday — in fact, it could have been written at almost any point in history. It describes events and situations that humans have always faced: violence, destruction, fear and injustice. We are not sure when the prophet Habakkuk lived and exercised his ministry. The best estimates are the very late seventh century B.C., possibly during the reign of Josiah the King.

We are always our brother’s keeper

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26th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Sept. 25 (Amos 6:1a, 4-7; Psalm 146; 1 Timothy 6:11-16; Luke 16:19-31)

The absence of love is indifference, and it is indifference that will bring our world low if we are not more heedful of divine law.