Mary, the Holy Mother of God (Year A) Jan. 1 (Numbers 6:22-27; Psalm 67; Galatians 4:4-7; Luke 2:16-21)

The exodus from Egypt began well. In just a few words, God revealed His intentions and high hopes for Israel. The blessing that Aaron was to give to the people called for the care and protection of God as well as God’s graciousness and peace. 

God's Word on Sunday: God has always been at work on our behalf

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Nativity of the Lord (Year A) Dec. 25 (Isaiah 52:7-10; Psalm 98; Hebrews 1:1-6; John 1:1-18)

We all long for some good news for a change. Most are sick of the steady flow of darkness, pain and negativity that bombard us each day. What would it be like to hear some absolutely wonderful news? What would it be? 

God's Word on Sunday: God indeed is always with us

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Fourth Sunday of Advent (Year A) Dec. 18 (Isaiah 7:10-14; Psalm 24; Romans 1:1-7; Matthew 1:18-24)

God, give me a sign! How often we may have wished and prayed fervently for a sign, especially when we were in a desperate situation. 

God's Word on Sunday: Live a worthy life as we await the Lord

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Third Sunday of Advent (Year A) Dec. 11 (Isaiah 35:1-6a, 10; Psalm 146; James 5:7-10; Matthew 11:2-11)

Should we blame God for the dark and frightening state of the world? People tend to do that in one way or another. Either they blame God for “allowing” negative things to happen and then reject God, or they accuse God outright of being the perpetrator. 

God's Word on Sunday: We must lay the foundation for the Saviour

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Second Sunday of Advent (Year A) Dec. 4 (Isaiah 11:1-10; Psalm 72; Romans 15:4-9; Matthew 3:1-12)

The prophecy from Isaiah does not describe anyone we have ever met, or the sort of person seen in the media. Although a descendant of King David, the figure seems to be from another world far above our own. He represents humanity’s hope and dream for millennia — someone who will put the world right. The saviour figure is one who is wise, just, righteous in judgment, incorruptible and filled with understanding and knowledge of God. 

In poverty we are with the Crucified Christ

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These are dangerously murky times. Passionate voices ring out all over; few listen to each other. We risk losing one another as forces pull and push us apart, like the sudden crush in a crowd, when people going different directions create forces by which some get suffocated and trampled. How can we find our way together amidst such forces?  

God's Word on Sunday: Jesus’ ‘armour of light’ will slay the darkness

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First Sunday of Advent (Year A) Nov. 27 (Isaiah 2:1-5; Psalm 122; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44)

Some visions are glimpses into the future, while others reflect deep longing and hope. We begin our journey through Advent with both a sense of hope and a bit of anxiety about our world. 

God's Word on Sunday: There are no shortcuts — God is the only path

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Christ the King (Year C) Nov. 20 (2 Samuel 5:1-3; Psalm 122; Colossians 1:12-20; Luke 23: 35-43)

When and where was David anointed king of Israel? Take your pick — Scripture reports three events, in 1 Samuel 16:13, 2 Samuel 2:4 and 5:3. We could go through all sorts of tortured explanations in an attempt to harmonize the text, or we could accept the more likely reason: they represent three separate traditions regarding his rise to power. Regardless of the explanation, the mere fact of having a king represented a step backward for Israel. 

Rekindling Advent in parishes

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Advent Season is here again. On Sunday Nov. 27, the Church begins a new liturgical year — Year A, with the celebration of the First Sunday of the new liturgical Season of Advent. 

All is given, all is received

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“Our manuscript has gone safe to the Printer.” So wrote Sheldon Vanauken (“Van”) in A Severe Mercy, after his beloved wife’s painful and young death.

God's Word on Sunday: So much more awaits us in God’s Kingdom

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32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C) Nov. 6 (2 Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14; Psalm 17; 2 Thessalonians 2:16-3:5; Luke 20:27-38)

Would we be willing to suffer torture and death for our faith and our inner convictions? We could be like Peter in the gospels and insist that we would stand fast even if everyone else chickened out. It is easy to boast of our courage and fortitude as long as the suffering is merely theoretical. But if we were to be hauled before authorities and forced to decide on the spot, it would not be so easy — in fact, the mere thought can be frightening.