Being a hospital chaplain during a pandemic means finding ways to deal with constant suffering.

One snowy day last February, looking out the window, I saw our next-door neighbour, broom in hand, trotting briskly through our backyard.

Prudence, courage, temperance and justice won’t stop a virus. When it comes to microbiology, the cardinal virtues are largely irrelevant. 

Father’s Day is a time to celebrate the men who go above and beyond for their family, and for former CFL star Doyle Orange going the whole nine yards (plus one) is second nature. 

It is not wrong to say that Laudato Si’ is an encyclical about ecology or climate change. But nobody gets full marks for that answer.

Krystyna Zasowski had just moved into a new neighbourhood, and with her first daughter starting kindergarten, she was looking for some mom-bonding.

Being isolated and away from friends and extended family can take its toll on anyone, but imagine being 18, pregnant or recently given birth, or coping with mental health issues or other societal complications.

Mother Teresa was once famously quoted as saying, “If you want to change the world, go home and love your family.”

Loneliness is certainly not unique to this time of pandemic, but it is no surprise that under quarantine we are lonelier than ever.

While physical distancing has left people feeling isolated, outreach initiatives by the Kenora Catholic District School Board are fostering hope by helping students and families realize they are not alone.