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In response to the death of 41-year-old Terri Schiavo, Canada's Euthanasia Prevention Coalition is reminding the public of its power of attorney document aimed at preserving life.

Canadian implications in Schiavo debate

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OTTAWA - Terri Schiavo's slow death by dehydration and starvation after the March 18 removal of her feeding tube has pro-life activists and experts in medical ethics concerned about the implications for euthanasia and doctor-assisted suicide in Canada.

The mainstream news media have framed Schiavo's story as a 'right to die' issue, because her husband's decision to have the feeding tube removed was based on his claims that Terri had told him she would not want to live should she be stricken with a disability like the persistent vegetative state doctors say was brought on by heart failure 15 years ago.

EU euthanasia report flawed

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TORONTO - All the favourite arguments for euthanasia are on display in the latest attempt in Europe to jettison bans on allowing doctors to legally put someone to death, says one of North America's top bioethicists. And they can all be countered by solid reasoning.

Church's duty is to respect life, Fabbro says

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{mosimage}TORONTO - The battle over using human embryos in stem-cell research is not just about creating cures for dreaded diseases. It is more importantly about treating human life as raw material that is expendable in the pursuit of scientific research, says Bishop Ron Fabbro of London, Ont.

COLF raises concerns about morning-after pill's abortive potential

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OTTAWA - The Catholic Organization for Life and Family (COLF) says the media and the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPA) have 'glossed over' the abortive potential of the so-called morning-after pill.

The federal government announced in May that it plans to make the morning-after pill available without a prescription across Canada. Currently, the pill is only available without prescription in British Columbia, Quebec and Saskatchewan.

Three faiths face death with meaning

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TORONTO - Friendly volunteers checked bags. Police hovered discreetly at the back of the room. After weeks of spray-painted swastikas and arson, everybody expected the security and nobody talked about it.

Recent hate crimes wouldn't stop about 300 Muslims, Jews and Catholics from gathering at Beth Tikvah Synagogue to listen to ethicists and doctors speak about how to care for their dying parents.

Churches examine a greener way

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TORONTO - How many Christians does it take to change a standard incandescent light bulb to an environmentally friendly one? Though this sounds like a comic riddle, for Christian faith communities who came to Toronto from across Canada for the National Consultation on Energy Efficiency for Religious Buildings Nov. 17-18, the issue of energy consumption was a deeply spiritual matter.

Courts, 'pro-death' lobby thwarted care for Terry Schiavo

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{mosimage}HAMILTON, Ont. - Bobby Schindler, brother to Terri Schiavo, said his family had no idea how powerful and aggressive the pro-euthanasia movement is in the United States until they were faced with its full force in the legal battle over his sister's life.

"The underlying issue is money," the 41-year-old Schindler told The Catholic Register April 21 at the annual conference of Ontario Alliance for Life.

No charges laid in Nova Scotia assisted suicide

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euthanasia.jpgOTTAWA - The RCMP investigation into a complaint laid by the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition concerning the death of a Nova Scotia woman who sought assisted suicide in Switzerland will not lead to any charges being laid.

St. Anthony’s School celebrates 100 years

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{mosimage}TORONTO - One hundred years on and St. Anthony’s Catholic School is still teaching girls like Hailey Moreno reading, spelling and arithmetic, plus getting them ready for first Communion. In the last weeks of her Grade 1 year, Moreno is more than happy the centenarian school is going strong in a brand new building.

Archbishop Collins awarded St. Mike’s honorary degree

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TORONTO - Universities are at the centre of Catholic life, says Toronto Archbishop Thomas Collins, and that is why the Catholic Church began to create universities in the Middle Ages.