Canada has had a long tradition of welcoming refugees looking to escape persecution. One of the most seminal events in that history came in the fall of 1956, when Hungarians revolted against their Communist rulers. They were met with a massive show of force as Soviet tanks rolled through the streets of Budapest and crushed the revolt within days. In early November, thousands of Hungarians began fleeing to Austria. Canada reacted quickly, providing swift approval of refugee claims and within a month they began arriving. Eventually Canada gave asylum to about 37,500 Hungarians and lent support in their first year in Canada. The majority were Roman Catholic, so it’s no surprise the Church played an important role dealing with the new arrivals as this Register story from the Dec. 8, 1956 illustrates. 


Need, hope grows as Out of the Cold digs in to help the homeless

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In 2006, after 20 years of stellar work with the Out of the Cold program to shelter the homeless, its co-founder was not impressed.

King’s University College doubles down on its future

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King’s University College has taken a big step into its own future by doubling the size of its campus footprint.

The Register Archives: A glimpse of the faith, courage of Canada's WWI army chaplains

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This year, Remembrance Day takes on an extra special aura, as Nov. 11 marks the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War. Close to 61,000 Canadians lost their lives in the conflict and another 172,000 were wounded. The Canadian Chaplaincy Service was a vital part of the war effort, with close to 450 clergy serving overseas. Among them were 90 Catholic priests who were never far from the front lines. The Catholic Register kept its readers informed with updates from the Chaplaincy Service. The following is the report in the Oct. 31, 1918 issue.


The Register Archive: ‘Crisis of faith’ prompts Leger to resign

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Cardinal Paul-Emile Leger was Canada’s most prominent prelate in the 1950s and ‘60s. Surprisingly, he resigned Nov. 9, 1967 and for the next 24 years, until his death in 1991 at age 87, he dedicated himself to service in the Third World, though he returned to Montreal several times. Here is how he explained his departure in The Register issue of Nov. 18, 1967. 


The many ways of giving

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An estate gift to your parish or favourite charity can be your way of expressing what was important in your life. What follows are some of the ways people choose to remember charities in their estate plan.

Graduated Rate Estates: What you need to know

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In 2016 the Canada Revenue Agency significantly changed the taxation of trusts by introducing a new category known as a General Rate Estate, or GRE.

Endowments: The gifts that keep giving

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A lot of people think that creating an endowment fund is something only rich people can afford. 

Life insurance can leave a lasting legacy

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Have you ever wished you could do more to support the meaningful work of your church or favourite charity?

Digital footprints can haunt your estate

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Eric Bundgard has some sage advice for everyone: you know death is a reality we will all face, so be prepared for when it occurs.

Cardinal Ambrozic's painting reveals art of the deal

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Former Toronto cardinal, Aloysius Ambrozic, wasn’t a big collector of art.