OTTAWA -- A new public opinion poll indicates Canadians are not as supportive of major changes to the federal MAiD (medical assistance in dying) system as the federal government claims.

Dignity recovered for forgotten vets

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Patrick James Cox was a decorated soldier honoured for serving in France with the 7th Canadian Railway Troops in 1917, but in 1933 died at the Lakeshore Psychiatric Hospital in Toronto fighting a very different battle.

Immigration levels will be tough to meet

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Ottawa’s plan to take in a record 1.2 million immigrants between now and 2023, just under 15 per cent of them refugees, faces some serious COVID-era challenges, according to the churches and other organizations who sponsor over 20,000 refugees per year.

Catholic hockey academy boasts NHL-level talent

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Grade 9 to 12 students enrolled in the Hockey Canada Skills Academy (HCSA) at Sudbury, Ont.’s St. Charles College enjoyed multiple years in the orbit of an eventual history-making NHL draft pick.

Thousands tune in to virtual Cardinal’s Dinner

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The COVID-19 pandemic is an opportunity for Toronto Catholics to “go deeper” into their spiritual lives, Cardinal Thomas Collins told thousands who gathered before television and computer screens for the most unusual Cardinal’s Dinner in over four decades.

Papal openness to LGBT community welcomed

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Mike Hyland will always remember the day when his 22-year-old son came to him with tears in his eyes and between sobs told his father he was gay. That memory surfaced again when headlines around the world trumpeted Pope Francis declaring gay people have a right to live in a family and should have legal protections.

Nuclear arms and Canada

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With the treaty banning nuclear weapons about to become international law, Global Affairs Canada has softened its opposition. But it’s still on the wrong side of history, according to Project Ploughshares executive director Cesar Jaramillo.

China’s threats to religious freedom worrying

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OTTAWA -- Religious and human rights groups have applauded a parliamentary committee’s condemnation of the Chinese government for its “genocide” on religious minorities.

Court challenge targets Quebec secularism law

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OTTAWA -- Lawyers challenging Bill 21, Quebec’s so-called secularism law, are arguing that because the law disproportionately targets women the provincial government cannot use the notwithstanding clause to shield it from any challenge.

Hospitals see rise in moral distress

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“I knew I had to quit when my 15-year-old daughter would say, ‘Mom, don’t go to work and cry again.’ ”

Eparch’s departure catches Slovak Catholics by surprise

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Canada’s tiny Byzantine-rite Slovak diocese based in Toronto was shocked to learn it no longer had a bishop as of Oct. 20.