{mosimage}TORONTO - An Order of Canada recipient who founded an orphanage for girls in Haiti is continuing his legal challenge to the federal government over Dr. Henry Morgentaler’s award nomination, even though the controversial pro-abortion activist received the country’s highest civilian honour on Oct. 10.

Frank Chauvin, a retired police detective from Windsor, Ont., launched a judicial review application in late July to the Federal Court of Canada through lawyer Gerard Charette. Toronto lawyer Phil Horgan is also helping with the case.

Stock market causes chaos with charities

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{mosimage}TORONTO - Plunging prices on Bay Street and Wall Street aren’t just a problem for the stock market. Since changes in tax laws governing gifts of stock in 2006, stock market joy has been joy for charities — and stock market trouble will be trouble for charities, including churches.

Beginning in May 2006, donors have been able to deduct 100 per cent of the value of any donations of stock to a registered charity up to a value of 75 per cent of their net annual income. If their gift exceeds that 75-per-cent threshold the donor can carry forward the deduction for up to five years.

ShareLife ready for tough year

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{mosimage}TORONTO - When times get tough, the tough get going. That isn’t the theme for this year’s ShareLife corporate campaign, but it could well be.

ShareLife launched its annual campaign to raise funds from the Catholic business community in Toronto Oct. 9 as headlines in newspapers around the world continued to trumpet the gloomy news about economic crisis, bank bailouts and plummeting stock prices.

Social justice and the new evangelization

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{mosimage}TORONTO — Since Pope John Paul II launched the term “new evangelization” on a visit to Latin America 25 years ago theologians, pastors and catechists have been trying to more fully understand what a new evangelization entails.

Pastor and theologian Bishop Claude Champagne believes the new evangelization has a lot to do with social justice. The auxiliary bishop of Halifax will outline just how justice and evangelizing are connected in the 2008-2009 Scarboro Missions Lecture. The lecture will be delivered twice — Nov. 21 at 7:30 p.m. at St. Jerome’s University in Waterloo, and the next day at 10 a.m. at Scarboro Missions, 2685 Kingston Rd., Scarborough.

The Oblate bishop taught missiology, the branch of theology which researches missionary work, at Saint Paul University in Ottawa until he was called to the episcopacy in 2003.

Vatican astronomer to speak in Toronto

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{mosimage}TORONTO — For those who get science, and for those who don’t, Vatican Observatory astronomer Fr. George V. Coyne has a message about the relationship between the sacred and science.

The Jesuit scientist will be at the Newman Centre chapel on the campus of the University of Toronto Nov. 12 at 7:30 p.m. to deliver a free public lecture. “The Dance of the Fertile Universe: Searching for God in a Scientific Culture” will be the second lecture in this year’s Jesuit-sponsored “Naming the Holy” series.

Not only is there tea and cookies at the end, but the audience is invited to engage the “Naming the Holy” speakers in conversation.

Sister of Sion to give interfaith talk

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{mosimage}TORONTO — Jewish-Christian dialogue is what  the Sisters of Sion do, so it should be no surprise that Sr. Lucy Thorson has been doing it for 30 years in Jerusalem, Rome and North America.

Still, every journey is different. So, at 7 p.m. Oct. 28 at the Scarboro Missions headquarters at 2685 Kingston Rd., Thorson will talk about her own journey of faith following the great opening of Christian-Jewish Dialogue at the end of the Second Vatican Council.

The talk will be one of Thorson’s first contributions since joining the Interfaith desk at the Scarboro Mission Society.

A Catholic view of Election 2008

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{mosimage}On Oct. 14, Canadian voters chose to replace its minority Conservative government in Ottawa with another, slightly larger, minority Conservative government. The Catholic Register asked five Catholics from across Canada who closely observed the election campaign, for their views on how the campaign unfolded and what needs to be done now. Below we present their responses to our questions.

Stain on Order of Canada official

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{mosimage}OTTAWA - On the Friday of Thanksgiving weekend, Canada’s Governor General invested abortionist Dr. Henry Morgentaler with the Order of Canada.

“The Order of Canada was created in order to acknowledge the great achievements of citizens who desire a better country,” said Archbishop Thomas Collins, archbishop of Toronto.

Election results: Canadians put Harper on a short leash

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{mosimage}The Canadian people woke up Oct. 15 to a new government that looks remarkably like the old government. They could be forgiven for scratching their heads and wondering what all the fuss was for.

As final polls were still being counted, it appeared that Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Conservatives would once again form a minority government with 143 seats in the House of Commons — 12 short of a majority. They face a Liberal party with 76 seats, the Bloc Quebecois with 50, the New Democrats with 37 and two independents.

Battle lines drawn for next pro-life legal fight

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{mosimage}TORONTO - Defending doctors’ conscience rights, Catholic groups’ freedom of speech and the anti-euthanasia movement represent the next legal battlegrounds for the pro-life movement, said activists at an international pro-life conference held in Toronto in early October.

Dr. Jack Willke, president of the U.S.-based International Right to Life Federation, told more than 200 conference participants on Oct. 4 that the struggle of the pro-life movement is similar to the anti-slavery movement because of the hostility and opposition that both groups have faced.

Social investers give low grades to Liberals, Conservatives.

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{mosimage}The Social Investment Organization grades the Liberals and the Conservatives with a D and an F on the issue of transparency for investors in Canada's stock markets.

The SIO gives top marks to the Greens and Bloc Quebecois and places the NDP in the middle. The Greens rate an A+, the Bloc a B+ and the NDP a B-.