Dutch Jesuit Father Frans van der Lugt visits a family in the besieged area of Homs, Syria, Jan. 30. Father Van der Lugt, who is living in the besieged area, made an appeal for help on a YouTube video, highlighting severe shortages of food and medicine. CNS photo/Yazan Homsy, Reuters

Jesuit, who used YouTube to appeal for help for Homs, reportedly killed

By 
  • April 7, 2014

ROME - A 75-year-old Dutch Jesuit who refused to leave wartorn Syria, instead staying in Homs to help the poor and homeless, was beaten by armed men and killed with two bullets to the head, according to an e-mail sent by the Jesuits' Middle East province to the Jesuit headquarters in Rome.

Jesuit Father Frans van der Lugt, who had worked in Syria since 1966, declined suggestions to leave because he wanted to help Syria's suffering civilians — "Christians and Muslims — anyone in need," said Fr. Giuseppe Bellucci, head of the Jesuits' press office.

The e-mail, reporting that armed men had taken Fr. Van der Lugt, beaten him and then shot him dead in front of the Jesuit residence in Homs, was sent to the Jesuit headquarters April 7, Bellucci said. "That's all the information we have right now."

Fr. Van der Lugt became known around the world after appealing for aid for the people of the besieged city of Homs in a video posted on YouTube in late January.

The United Nations supervised an evacuation of about 1,400 people from Homs in early February; arriving in Jordan, the refugees confirmed Fr. Van der Lugt's accounts of people, especially young children, starving to death.

Speaking to Catholic News Service by telephone Feb. 6, the Jesuit had said: "There has been no food. People are hungry and waiting for help. No injured people have been allowed to leave. Families have been hoping to get out of the siege and out of the fighting between the two sides.

"The wounded have not received proper treatment, so healing has been difficult. Newborns die very quickly because of a lack of milk," he said. "There have been cases of death due to hunger and starvation."

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