News/International

How many world leaders come and go at the United Nations headquarters in New York with nary a word to say to the staff? Almost all, I would daresay. But not Pope Benedict XVI. Before rushing off to his next even after his major address April 18 to the UN General Assembly, he dallied a while to talk to the hired help.

Thanking the hired help

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How many world leaders come and go at the United Nations headquarters in New York with nary a word to say to the staff? Almost all, I would daresay. But not Pope Benedict XVI. Before rushing off to his next even after his major address April 18 to the UN General Assembly, he dallied a while to talk to the hired help.

Rights don't trump God, says Pope Benedict

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{mosimage}NEW YORK - In his first address to the United Nations, Pope Benedict XVI delivered a staunch defence of religious freedom in the face of secular pressure to privatize faith.

Pope challenges universities, meets with abuse victims

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{mosimage}WASHINGTON - Day three of Pope Benedict XVI's visit to Washington and New York covered the gamut of events and emotions — from the joy of a papal Mass to a no-nonsense challenge to Catholic universities, to a tear-filled visit with victims of clergy sexual abuse.

In an April 17 address at the Catholic University of America, Pope Benedict XVI said he believes in academic freedom, but at a Catholic university, it has limits. And he drew a line in the sand in a speech to leaders of the United States' Catholic education institutions.

An unscheduled meeting

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It's not clear whether Pope Benedict XVI expected he would have to concentrate so much on dealing with the fallout of the clergy sexual abuse on this, his first visit to the United States. But he is devoting a significant part of his time to trying to heal this very open wound. Besides his three strong public comments on it, he also met privately with a small group of abuse victims on April 17.

An unscheduled meeting

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It's not clear whether Pope Benedict XVI expected he would have to concentrate so much on dealing with the fallout of the clergy sexual abuse on this, his first visit to the United States. But he is devoting a significant part of his time to trying to heal this very open wound. Besides his three strong public comments on it, he also met privately with a small group of abuse victims on April 17.

Benedict hits a home run

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The Nationals Stadium is one of those brand new baseball facilities designed to bring back the excitement and intimacy of those old-time ball parks. It was only finished March 30 and has held 2 games of the Washington Nationals so far, reportedly to critical acclaim. But a Catholic Mass for 46,000 people is a much different kind of test.

Benedict hits a home run

By
The Nationals Stadium is one of those brand new baseball facilities designed to bring back the excitement and intimacy of those old-time ball parks. It was only finished March 30 and has held 2 games of the Washington Nationals so far, reportedly to critical acclaim. But a Catholic Mass for 46,000 people is a much different kind of test.

Oh yes, they had a meeting too

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In all the excitement, flag-waving and crowds surrounding Pope Benedict's public meetings, it is almost forgotten that he also had a quiet, private conversation with U.S. President George Bush on April 16. And while it was billed as a courtesy call, it turns out there was some rather substantive — if courteous — discussion.

Oh yes, they had a meeting too

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In all the excitement, flag-waving and crowds surrounding Pope Benedict's public meetings, it is almost forgotten that he also had a quiet, private conversation with U.S. President George Bush on April 16. And while it was billed as a courtesy call, it turns out there was some rather substantive — if courteous — discussion.

Pope tackles sex abuse and the 3 'isms'

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{mosimage}WASHINGTON - Pope Benedict XVI spent day two of his first visit to the United States dealing with his favourite topic — and his least favourite.

In two public events on his 81st birthday, the Pope returned to a theme he has often developed — the role of religion in support of a strong civic life. And in an attempt to begin to heal the still-open wound of the clergy sexual abuse crisis that rocked the country in 2002, he devoted a considerable portion of his talk to the 350 or so American bishops to the topic.