News/International

It's not clear whether Pope Benedict XVI expected he would have to concentrate so much on dealing with the fallout of the clergy sexual abuse on this, his first visit to the United States. But he is devoting a significant part of his time to trying to heal this very open wound. Besides his three strong public comments on it, he also met privately with a small group of abuse victims on April 17.

Benedict hits a home run

By

The Nationals Stadium is one of those brand new baseball facilities designed to bring back the excitement and intimacy of those old-time ball parks. It was only finished March 30 and has held 2 games of the Washington Nationals so far, reportedly to critical acclaim. But a Catholic Mass for 46,000 people is a much different kind of test.

Benedict hits a home run

By
The Nationals Stadium is one of those brand new baseball facilities designed to bring back the excitement and intimacy of those old-time ball parks. It was only finished March 30 and has held 2 games of the Washington Nationals so far, reportedly to critical acclaim. But a Catholic Mass for 46,000 people is a much different kind of test.

Oh yes, they had a meeting too

By

In all the excitement, flag-waving and crowds surrounding Pope Benedict's public meetings, it is almost forgotten that he also had a quiet, private conversation with U.S. President George Bush on April 16. And while it was billed as a courtesy call, it turns out there was some rather substantive — if courteous — discussion.

Oh yes, they had a meeting too

By
In all the excitement, flag-waving and crowds surrounding Pope Benedict's public meetings, it is almost forgotten that he also had a quiet, private conversation with U.S. President George Bush on April 16. And while it was billed as a courtesy call, it turns out there was some rather substantive — if courteous — discussion.

Pope tackles sex abuse and the 3 'isms'

By

{mosimage}WASHINGTON - Pope Benedict XVI spent day two of his first visit to the United States dealing with his favourite topic — and his least favourite.

In two public events on his 81st birthday, the Pope returned to a theme he has often developed — the role of religion in support of a strong civic life. And in an attempt to begin to heal the still-open wound of the clergy sexual abuse crisis that rocked the country in 2002, he devoted a considerable portion of his talk to the 350 or so American bishops to the topic.

Of Vespers, incense and lapsed Catholics

By

The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington is one imposing pile. The largest Roman Catholic Church in the United States, it blends Romanesque, Byzantine and modern styles into a church truly conducive to prayer and worship. And some thoughtful introspection, as Pope Benedict XVI offered his American fellow bishops on April 16.

Of Vespers, incense and lapsed Catholics

By
The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington is one imposing pile. The largest Roman Catholic Church in the United States, it blends Romanesque, Byzantine and modern styles into a church truly conducive to prayer and worship. And some thoughtful introspection, as Pope Benedict XVI offered his American fellow bishops on April 16.

They know how to throw a party

By

The official welcome ceremony to Washington April 16 for Pope Benedict XVI on the lush south lawn of the White House was a colourful, even cheery, affair. It was full of music, marching bands, waving flags, kind words. Not to mention a spontaneous rendition of "Happy Birthday" for the Pope, who turned 81 that day.

They know how to throw a party

By

The official welcome ceremony to Washington April 16 for Pope Benedict XVI on the lush south lawn of the White House was a colourful, even cheery, affair. It was full of music, marching bands, waving flags, kind words. Not to mention a spontaneous rendition of "Happy Birthday" for the Pope, who turned 81 that day.

Americans greet the Pope with warmth and curiosity

By

{mosimage}WASHINGTON - As Pope Benedict XVI arrived here for the first North American visit of his papacy, the greetings ranged from a love-in to the critical to the just plain curious.

In fact, as Benedict touched down at Andrews Airforce Base outside the capital at 4 p.m. April 15, his visit was the talk of the town. Some 5,000 journalists were here filling the airwaves with everything from speculation on what he would say to reviews of the place of the church in American society. Over the next five days, until the Pope's departure from New York City on April 20, they would dissect every one of his words.