×

Warning

JUser: :_load: Unable to load user with ID: 101
Catholic Civil Rights League president Phil Horgan

Prostitution law goes into effect Dec. 6

By 
  • November 20, 2014

OTTAWA - Canada’s prostitution Bill C-36 passed the Senate Nov. 6 and will go into effect Dec. 6, criminalizing the purchase of sex for the first time in Canadian history. 

While groups representing some “sex trade” workers are not pleased with the legislation, pro-family groups and those opposed to human trafficking welcomed the new law, which is based on the Nordic model that treats prostitutes as victims, but prosecutes the “johns” and the pimps who exploit them. 

“The (Catholic Civil Rights) League is pleased with the federal government’s passage of the new bill,” said League president Phil Horgan. “It is our view that the criminalization of the purchase of sex services, and the sale of such services in vulnerable areas, accords with the views of the vast majority of Canadians... This restraint in the criminal law will be a piece of the arsenal to deter the exploitation of women and minors, who are targeted by purveyors of sex.” 

The League intervened in the courts up to the Supreme Court of Canada, which struck down sections of Canada’s prostitution laws as unconstitutional last December but suspended the decision for a year to give Parliament time to draft new legislation. 

REAL Women of Canada, another intervener in the court battle, also welcomed the new law. 

“Although this prostitution bill is not perfect in that REAL Women would have preferred that all prostitution be prohibited entirely, it does provide more protection for prostitutes and protects children by prohibiting prostitution activities from taking place where children are present,” the pro-life, pro-family women’s group said in a news release. 

“This is a historic moment for equality and women’s rights in Canada,” said Conservative MP Joy Smith, whose ground-breaking work against human trafficking contributed to the government’s new approach to prostitution. “For the first time in Canada’s history, the buying and advertising of sexual services will be illegal, and the government will provide robust funding to help women and youth escape prostitution,” she said. 

“Under Bill C-36, Canada is saying loud and clear, we do not accept that women, children and vulnerable individuals are commodities to be bought and sold. I want to build a Canada that targets predators and pimps, helps vulnerable individuals escape prostitution, and upholds the dignity of women. We can do better for women and youth, and with the passing of Bill C-36, we will.” 

But the organization POWER, an advocacy group for Ottawa-area prostitutes, called the legislation a “missed opportunity” that reproduces “the harms” of the previous laws that had been struck down as unconstitutional. POWER board chair Emily Symons said she did not think the new law will pass a constitutional challenge. 

POWER warned the new laws would make the risks of violence for sex workers even higher. 

But REAL Women disputes the idea prostitution can be made safe. 

“Prostitution is inherently dangerous, no matter where it takes place, on the streets, in cars, in brothels or by way of escort services because it always involves unpredictable, uncontrollable factors from which there can be no protection.” 

Comments (1)

This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

From the Economist:"As paid-for sex becomes more readily and discreetly available online, more people will buy it. A greater awareness may develop that not all sex workers are the victims of exploitation..But, overall, sex workers will profit"

So...

From the Economist:"As paid-for sex becomes more readily and discreetly available online, more people will buy it. A greater awareness may develop that not all sex workers are the victims of exploitation..But, overall, sex workers will profit"

So criminalizing only the buying of sex is a good idea?

Read More
There are no comments posted here yet

Leave your comments

  1. Posting comment as a guest. Sign up or login to your account.
Attachments (0 / 3)
Share Your Location

Support The Catholic Register

Unlike many other news websites, The Catholic Register has never charged readers for access to the news and information on our site. We want to keep our award-winning journalism as widely available as possible. But we need your help.

For more than 125 years, The Register has been a trusted source of faith based journalism. By making even a small donation you help ensure our future as an important voice in the Catholic Church. If you support the mission of Catholic journalism, please donate today. Thank you. 


Comment

Faith

Pope's Homily

Features

Arts