Archdiocese of Toronto explores Sr. Carmelina Tarantino's sainthood cause

By 
  • March 22, 2009
{mosimage}TORONTO - The journey to possible sainthood for Sr. Carmelina Tarantino has begun.

A panel of theologians and historians, under the auspices of  the archdiocese of Toronto, has officially started an examination of the life of the Toronto nun to ascertain her candidacy for sainthood. The inquiry was to be opened at a Mass celebrated at St. Paschal Baylon Church March 16 by Archbishop Thomas Collins.

The archdiocese received approval to proceed — the nihil obstat — from the Vatican last September. An  examination of life is the first of four steps in the process to sainthood.

The examination is being conducted by the archdiocese of Toronto because that is where Sr. Carmelina died in 1992.

Sr. Carmelina was born in Italy in 1934 and came to Toronto in 1964 in search of answers to an unexplained illness. A rare cancer was suspected but never confirmed through a period of suffering that included amputation of a leg and a mastectomy.

She remained devout throughout her ordeal and, despite being confined to a hospital bed for 24 years, became a nun with the Passionist Sisters of the Cross in 1977. From her hospital bed she dispensed counselling to thousands of people in person or by phone before her death at age 55.

During the examination phase, the investigating panel will interview witnesses, review documents and invite members of the public to come forward with information and evidence.

Anyone with evidence is invited to contact Deacon Joe DiGrado (905-876-9486).

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