higher ed

{mosimage}After the doors close at St. Mary’s Elementary School in Hamilton, Ont., Grade 8 student Joana Sampaio will swing by the school’s playground to meet up with the friends she first met in Kindergarten.

It will be a chance for them to reminisce about their time at St. Mary’s.


Ranking Ontario schools misses point of existence

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{mosimage}TORONTO - When principal Angelo Bolotta makes his usual morning rounds down the hallway, he greets each student he meets by name.

It’s this community spirit, he says, that helps Cardinal Carter Academy for the Arts students excel.

The school for Grade 7 to 12 students ranks as the top Catholic school in Toronto in the Fraser Institute’s latest report card on Ontario high schools.


Toronto students aim to leave eco-legacy

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{mosimage}TORONTO - When nine-year-old Erica Martin and her friends take a break from playing in the schoolyard, they sit down on the yellow gas pipes along the side of the yard.

But as the weather gets warmer, the St. Brigid Elementary School students say resting on the metal pipes isn’t exactly a good idea.

“Students need shade. Sometimes it gets too hot,” said nine-year-old Erica.

Christian Brothers seek support for Mideast peace and Bethlehem University

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{mosimage}TORONTO - As they swing through North America drumming up interest and financial support for Bethlehem University , Br. Jack Curran and Br. Peter Bray of the Christian Brothers warn against any hard and fast convictions about who is right and who is wrong in the Middle East.

“To be pro one side or the other side is simplistic,” said Curran, the vice president for development at Bethlehem University. “But there has to be a truth some place in the middle.”

Tiny Bethlehem University, with less than 3,000 undergraduates and a sprinkling of graduate programs leading to masters degrees, isn’t going to singlehandedly find that truth and light the path to peace — but it has a role to play, said Bray.


Toronto school trustees seek forgiveness

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{mosimage}TORONTO - We’re sorry, ask for your forgiveness and hope you will trust us again.

That was the message from 12 Toronto Catholic District School Board trustees in a public apology.

“Words cannot express how truly sorry we are for the embarrassment, anxiety and frustration we have caused to the school communities, our staff and Catholic ratepayers for our actions, lack of actions and mistakes,” the trustees said in a May 1 statement.

Serious trust issues identified at St. Jerome's University

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{mosimage}There’s plenty of blame to go around in the furor at St. Jerome’s University , and it’s going to take the Christian value of forgiveness to get the small, Catholic liberal arts college back on track, according to a consultant who spent two months investigating the university’s troubles.

“The Gospel values that are included in the mission statement are a very good reference point for everybody in this particular exercise. Some part of that involves good Christian value of forgiveness,” Ken Snowdon told The Catholic Register.


Students aim for zero waste

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{mosimage}TORONTO - Students at St. John the Evangelist Catholic School spread the word about striving for a world of zero waste through a Grade 5/6 play called What a Lot of Garbage on April 27.

The students presented the play before parents, friends, local politicians MPP Laura Albanese and City Councillor Frances Nunziata and Director of Education Ann Perron.

The play was a dialogue between a reporter, a student, Mother Nature, garbage, businessmen, the government and more as they travel through time to see the effects of human actions. 


Manuel Cordeiro earns Ontario Premier teaching award

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{mosimage}TORONTO - Comics books and D-Day simulations aren’t the standard teaching tools.

But for teacher Manuel Cordeiro, it’s these unconventional methods of boosting students’ reading and analytical skills which have garnered him a Premier’s Award of Teaching Excellence as a new teacher.

Cordeiro is a social science teacher at St. Edmund Campion High School. He began teaching at the school in October.


Parents rescue Holy Name of Mary School

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{mosimage}TORONTO - Ontario’s only private Catholic school for girls in Grades 5 to 12 was going to be the latest casualty of the economic crisis.

But a group of parents has come up with a plan to keep the doors of Mississauga’s Holy Name of Mary College School open.

Parent Dan Giampuzzi said when the school announced in March that it was going to close due to low enrolment, he and three parents came together to try to save it. They proposed lower tuition rates, more funding for bursaries and financial assistance and a new Grade 5 and 6 class for parents who wanted to send their younger children to the school. And $300,000 was also raised.

Code of conduct recommended for Ontario school trustees

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{mosimage}TORONTO - Ontario’s education minister should establish a provincial code of conduct for all school boards, says a new report .

In its April 22 report, the Governance Review Committee recommended that the minister consult with trustees or trustee organizations to set a minimum code of conduct for trustees.

While noting that many school boards already have policies on ethics or conduct for trustees, the committee said creating a uniform code of conduct would “ensure some level of consistency across the province.”


Ontario Catholic Education Week extends beyond class

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{mosimage}Parishes across Ontario are being invited to support Catholic Education Week by getting involved with school activities, reflecting on the significant contribution made to the church and to society by Catholic education and by participating in prayer celebrations being held across the province.

The week of May 3-9 has been designated as Catholic Education Week in Ontario, but the celebration extends beyond classrooms. Parishes are being asked to include a notice in Sunday bulletins to invite parishioners to become involved.