In the wake of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s call to include more study on Indigenous issues in school curriculum, it appears educators across the country are taking the recommendations to heart.

Published in Canada

Cancer has taken one of the Church’s constant, quiet, faithful and fervent servants. Canadian economist John Dillon, who worked 44 years in ecumenical social justice movements, died unexpectedly June 5. He was 68 years old.

Published in Canada

A recent decision to withdraw from Kairos doesn’t in any way diminish the commitment of Canada’s bishops to ecumenism or social justice action, according to the bishops.

Published in Canada

TORONTO – Canada’s Catholic bishops will no longer be part of Canada’s ecumenical social justice coalition known as Kairos.

Published in Canada

TORONTO – Canada’s Catholic bishops will no longer be part of Canada’s ecumenical social justice coalition, known as Kairos.

Published in Canada: Toronto-GTA

Romeo Maione was all talk but it was glorious talk, talk that made things happen. Mr. Maione used every podium and platform he could find to make the Church real and alive in the world.

Published in Canada

As Chief Theresa Spence passed three weeks living on nothing but water, fish broth and herbal tea, churches and Christian organizations were lining up behind her request for a meeting with Prime MInister Stephen Harper, Governor General David Johnston and aboriginal leaders from across the country.

Published in Canada
February 22, 2012

KAIROS chooses new leader

TORONTO - As she takes over as executive director of KAIROS, Jennifer Henry’s priority is keeping the ecumenical social justice organization close to its roots in Canada’s churches.

“My commitment is to preserve the ecumenical character of this organization and I think that’s also the commitment of people around the board table,” Henry told The Catholic Register.

Published in Canada

TORONTO - A half-dozen aboriginal youth headed for Geneva have shameful things to say about Canada and how it treats First Nations children. But their testimony before the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child will be given in the hope that Canada can do better, the young delegates told media in Toronto Feb. 2.

"There's been talk for years and years and years. If there's just going to be more talk, I wouldn't consider that a success," said 24-year-old John-Paul Chalykoff from the Michipicoten First Nation on the north shore of Lake Superior.

Published in Canada