Michael Swan, The Catholic Register

Michael Swan, The Catholic Register

Michael is Associate Editor of The Catholic Register.

He is an award-winning writer and photographer and holds a Master of Arts degree from New York University.

Follow him on Twitter @MmmSwan, or click here to email him.

Entering their 170th year of caring for the people of Toronto, the Sisters of St. Joseph want to celebrate their history, of course. But celebrating that ministry has to be about much more than history, said the Sisters of St. Joseph communications director Lisa Tabachnick.

When COVID-19 forced frontline workers to shift their support for homeless youth online, the result was more loneliness, more depression, more drug use, more overdoses and more thoughts of suicide, according to new research from Covenant House, Canada’s largest shelter serving young people.

It’s nice that Canada is going to look into how Canadian-made targeting systems are being used by the Turkish and Azerbaijani military, both engaged in active wars, before allowing any more sales or exports of the systems. But Ottawa will have to do more if it intends to live up to its signature on the international Arms Trade Treaty and international human rights law in general, according to a researcher at Project Ploughshares.

Entering their 170th year of caring for the people of Toronto, the Sisters of St. Joseph want to celebrate their history, of course. But celebrating that ministry has to be about much more than history, said the Sisters of St. Joseph communications director Lisa Tabachnick.

In an encyclical that might be characterized as ripped from the headlines, Pope Francis speaks some hard truths to Canadians, to Catholics and to the world.

Because the truth matters to investors, stock market regulators ought to demand the truth from mining companies with controversial operations in the poorer countries of the world.

Foreign Affairs Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne says he wants Canadian aid to Lebanon to reach ordinary Lebanese on the streets of Beirut, but that’s not what’s happening, says Ruby Dagher.

Outside the St. Brigid’s Out of the Cold shelter on the last official day of summer, as trees in the park are threatening to burst into red and gold, 28-year-old Harley was wondering whether this church basement might be a place where he could stay.

If John Turner hadn’t been talked out of it by his boss at the powerful Montreal law firm of Stikeman Elliott, he might have been a priest and not a politician. But he would have been one of those priests who wield power and influence under the genial guise of amusing tales, loyal friendships and long dinners within longer conversations.

If the Liberal government stands past the Sept. 23 throne speech, Martin Blanchet’s seven-year battle to get somebody with authority to look into how Canadian mining companies and others treat workers, communities and the environment in poor countries will finally get an airing in the House of Commons.