Every religion has celebrations tied to the natural world. Celebrations of birth and death, darkness and light, sowing and harvesting all mark the rhythms of our lives and our encounter with God. What does this mean for a humanity hurtling towards the ecological upheaval that a global temperature rise of three degrees promises to deliver? The spectre of climate chaos threatens to disrupt the order by which we connect to God through creation.

The infinitely fruitful horror of the Cross

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In Christ’s resurrection, we find the paradox of Christian faith — a God who bends away from displays of power and whose divinity is recognized by humble people to whom the Risen Lord has shown His face. The great event on which the world turns — the Resurrection — was witnessed by no one. Christ left an empty tomb and in His appearances went unrecognized until He willed the disciples to see His face.

Driving Miss Mary — a sisterly bond

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Many people know that I’m taking care of my aged mum now almost full time. What many people don’t know is that I’m also taking care of an even more aged half-sister. Her name is Mary.

Not all jokes are thigh slappers

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It’s been dubbed “the slap heard around the world.” During the March 27 Academy Awards ceremony, Will Smith went on stage and struck comedian Chris Rock in the face after Rock made a joke referring to Jada Pinkett Smith’s shaved head.

Natural world must form human nature

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St. Mary’s University in Calgary is situated on a sprawling 35-acre property adjacent to Fish Creek Park, the largest urban provincial park in Canada. As a result, our campus is often teaming with wildlife, and here I don’t just mean student parties.

Apology but one step toward reconciliation

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At the conclusion of the Lenten journey of Indigenous representatives to the Vatican, Pope Francis gave the delegation a laetare moment, a time to rejoice. The Pope’s poignant apology for the harm “members of the Catholic Church” did to Indigenous children in residential schools and his promise to visit Canada this summer is a major step toward healing a broken relationship.

‘Be not afraid’

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Walking recently through the University of Toronto campus, I noticed a young fellow on the other side of the street jogging energetically past.

Streets of saints among the demons

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The grip of a long, cold winter had finally been broken when I walked downtown on a warm St. Patrick’s night in Toronto. It was not long until I came across my first party. Some men were standing outside a shelter drinking and joking. I stopped and wished them a happy St. Patrick’s Day and asked if they lived in the shelter. Ray, standing next to me, said he used to live there but had moved up a step and now had his own apartment.

Christ lets us escape the trap of hate

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Tyrants commit many sins. They strip away individual freedom, unleash fear and terror, displace people from their homes and they murder indiscriminately. If you don’t believe me, turn on your television or find news reports from Kyiv and Mariupol, places that are looking more and more like Berlin at the end of the Second World War.

Luke Stocking: Learning to love Christ, not the bomb

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On March 1, I was mesmerized by an explosion. Verified footage of a Russian missile striking Freedom Square in Kharkiv, Ukraine, transformed a normal city scene into a giant fireball. The speed of its violence arrested me. “Where was the missile?” I thought. It only became visible to me as I looked for it in the replay. The long and deadly cylinder streaks downwards out of the sky and into the image a millisecond before transforming itself into death and destruction.

Gerry Turcotte: Blushing at what aliens would see

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How would aliens reconstruct skulls that they discovered here on Earth?