If you’re reading The Catholic Register, you’ve probably never said: “I’m spiritual but not religious.” However, you’ve certainly heard someone else state this now almost cliché phrase. Let’s count the ways this phrase is false… and dangerous. (What I generally say to people who tell me they are “spiritual but not religious” is: “You may want to be careful with that.”)

Let’s launch a year of living intentionally

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As society emerges from the spectre of the pandemic, we have a unique opportunity to construct a positive “new normal” in which we live out Gospel values personally and collectively.

Keeping the faith when cancer fills a room

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Each new cancer treatment has become a door to walk through. On the other side of the door is a new room. The door to the old room closes never to be opened again.

Thank God Father Stu saw the light

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The new film about a Montana priest, Father Stu, starring Mark Wahlberg and Mel Gibson, is ruffling some feathers. I’ve seen it, and didn’t think it was that controversial. Father Stu is based on the true story of a roughneck, smart-aleck, aimless young boxer who retires the gloves early and heads to Hollywood for a film career — only to discover God, the Church and his vocation to the priesthood through his new SoCal Catholic girlfriend.

Catechism must stir faith into action

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Near the beginning of what is arguably the Second Vatican Council’s most important document, the Council fathers wrote, “It pleased God, in His goodness and wisdom, to reveal Himself and to make known the mystery of His will... .” Knowing that mystery enables us to share in the life of God.

Where do all the homeless go?

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The statistics are chilling even though they are imperfect. CBC reported that in December 2021, 35 names were added to the Toronto Homeless Memorial list of those who died while homeless in Toronto. The actual number of deaths could be higher. 

Abbreviation falls short. Pls. read. Thx.

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Today’s social media world has made abbreviations seem more ubiquitous than ever.

Rising with the joy of every day miracles

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When I think about the long list of things I need to practice, resurrection has never made the list. But I have been returning to the theme year after year in my writing. In 2017, I wrote about not being ready to rise. The next year, I was baking buns and reflecting on relaxing into the rising work of God. And then, the danger of daring to embrace joy. Apparently, I need more practice than I thought.

Embrace the call to ecological conversion

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Every religion has celebrations tied to the natural world. Celebrations of birth and death, darkness and light, sowing and harvesting all mark the rhythms of our lives and our encounter with God. What does this mean for a humanity hurtling towards the ecological upheaval that a global temperature rise of three degrees promises to deliver? The spectre of climate chaos threatens to disrupt the order by which we connect to God through creation.

The infinitely fruitful horror of the Cross

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In Christ’s resurrection, we find the paradox of Christian faith — a God who bends away from displays of power and whose divinity is recognized by humble people to whom the Risen Lord has shown His face. The great event on which the world turns — the Resurrection — was witnessed by no one. Christ left an empty tomb and in His appearances went unrecognized until He willed the disciples to see His face.

Driving Miss Mary — a sisterly bond

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Many people know that I’m taking care of my aged mum now almost full time. What many people don’t know is that I’m also taking care of an even more aged half-sister. Her name is Mary.