Robert Kinghorn is a deacon of the Archdiocese of Toronto.


You can read his column, "The Church on the Street" in The Catholic Register.
You can contact him at robert.kinghorn@ekinghorn.com

Jesus said that we are called to be the light of the world and the salt of the Earth. But to be honest, some evenings on the street I just feel lightly salted. 

Robert Kinghorn: Angelic forces hard at work on the street

By

There is a sense that protection is required when we step out into the unknown darkness of life, whether it be the darkness of suffering or of a lifestyle tinged with fear and regret. Traditionally the Church has called upon the angelic hosts for such protection. 

Robert Kinghorn: A final wish for Betty, a dear friend

By

There is a truth about great journalists that long after their columns have faded into the ghosts of time, their words still come back to haunt or to comfort. 

Robert Kinghorn: Streets are filled with many crosses

By

I have always wondered what the conversation between Jesus and an image consultant would be like. 

A spiritual shelter from life’s storms

By

One of the great joys of the Church on the Street has been the memory of a spiritual group that used to meet at a women’s shelter. 

Robert Kinghorn: Blessings are often a two-way street

By

Contrary to what most of my professors believed, I sometimes paid attention when I was in the diaconate formation program at St. Augustine’s Seminary. Liturgically I may not have known my ambo from my elbow, but when it came to pastoral care I was totally present.

Robert Kinghorn: No one need walk alone on the road of despair

By

Alleluia, alleluia give thanks to the risen Lord Alleluia, alleluia give praise to His name.

The music had barely faded from our Easter liturgy when I walked into the hospital room of a woman I had been asked to visit but had never met.

Robert Kinghorn: Numbers can’t measure the blessings of street

By

There’s a saying statisticians love to trot out when questioned on the value of their surveys. “You are what you measure.”

Church on the Street: Restaurant served big plate of humanity

By

When I started out on the Church on the Street, I gave little thought to some of the logistics of such a ministry apart from determining that it would be 8 p.m. onwards every Thursday evening.

The Church on the Street: Searching for divine power in the eyes of a stranger

By

Some nights it does not take long for the temperature to plummet. I don’t mean the thermometer, but the temperature of the street. 

The Church on the Street: Reaching out a hand of hope

By
It is a frigid evening, and the setting sun leaves the grip of darkness on the downtown area where hope and despair wrestle nightly for sovereignty.
Page 1 of 2