Catholic Register Editorial

Catholic Register Editorial

The Catholic Register's editorial is published in the print and digital editions every week. Read the current and past editorials below.

As spring turns into summer, Canada is about to face a test of its generosity.

Maybe they didn’t get the memo. Maybe it was simple human error. Maybe they simply don’t care.

Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good. 

Canadian bishops must not have seen the hornets nest they were stepping into March 28 when they issued a somewhat ambiguously worded letter to Canada’s Indigenous peoples. 

Here we go again. Development and Peace, an organization created by Canada’s bishops, is back on the hot seat over allegations it failed to properly screen some overseas partners. At least 11 dioceses have withheld funds from the organization after suggestions that several of its partner agencies are offside on issues that include abortion, contraception and gender theory. 

In his report on the crisis in Myanmar, Canada’s special envoy to the region fell short of labelling Rohingya persecution a genocide. But that detail should not stop Canada from acting as if it is one.

The Catholic relationship with Canada’s Indigenous peoples no doubt wobbled with the announcement that Pope Francis is not coming here to offer the apology so explicitly called for by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. After so much suffering, it could hardly be otherwise.

Do not be afraid, the angel said to the frightened women at the empty tomb. Do not be afraid, the risen Christ told His anxious disciples behind locked doors.

Pope Paul V was a controversial leader in turbulent times. His biography cites a fondness for luxury, penchant for nepotism and persecution of Galileo, but also lauds his completion of St. Peter’s Basilica, contributions to education and the arts, encouragement of New World missionaries and the canonization St. Charles Borromeo.

It is a frightening world when those with power assume they can dictate to those without how they must think and what they must say.