Scandals in the Catholic Church: Bad news and good news

Leaders in the Catholic Church, like leaders in any organization, hate scandals. They wish that they never happen, and when they do, they try to deal with them internally so as not to get a lot of bad publicity.

Comment: Thank you, Steve Bannon

Nothing unites the bishops more than being attacked from the outside. And if there was ever any doubt about the bishops’ campaign for immigration reform, Steve Bannon’s recent attack will encourage the bishops to double down.

Comment: Who are we to judge the ‘quality of life’?

The tragic case of a 77-year-old woman, known only as AB, who had been wracked with intolerable pain for more than three decades, was resolved in August through doctor-induced death.

Or was it?

Comment: Making sense of God ... the heartbreaker

“Hey! Hey! Hey! Listen Up! Listen Up!”

Comment: Something good can come from nothing

Making something out of nothing. When somebody pulls that off, it tends to evoke wonder and admiration.

Comment: Bride’s best laid plans melt in Pope’s hand

Rome in June is notoriously hot. But Rome in June wearing a wedding veil is even hotter.

Comment: This time, Jesus is invited for our wedding vows

My wife and I, in our 40th year of married life, are renewing our vows this month at a special Mass in the Marian chapel of our home parish at London’s St. Peter’s Cathedral Basilica.

Comment: Chris fought the good fight, leaving behind a life lesson

It’s been one year since terminally ill Canadians have been legally free to choose medical intervention to end their lives. In that time, some 1,400 people have chosen assisted suicide.

Comment: On the contrary … adoption is a pro-life issue

In the May 21 issue of The Catholic Register Peter Stockland wrote a sincere Comment piece about the need for renewal within organizations. I agree with him on this point.

Comment: We can’t be bystanders in Islamophobia fight

Perhaps the greatest Roman Catholic voice to oppose Jewish prejudice was Pope John Paul II. He, more than any other Church leader, continues to enjoy the favour of the Jews. It was Pope John Paul II who categorically instructed the faithful that anti-Semitism is a serious sin.

Comment: Yes, there really are ways to ‘enjoy’ Lent

Heading into church last month for the noon-hour service on Ash Wednesday, I walked along the sidewalk behind two middle-aged couples decked out in office-type apparel. I overheard that one of the couples was heading out for a bite of lunch and the other was skipping lunch to attend the service that marks the beginning of Lenten fasting, penance and prayer that is now entering its final days before we reach the glory of Easter Sunday.