Readers Speak Out: May 8, 2022

Crisis of fear

Peter Stockland’s column “Be not afraid” references the over-the-top reaction to the pandemic, but it also has powerful theological implications.

Editorial: Ideological idols

The best thing to say about a recent report to the minister of national defence from an advisory panel on systemic racism and discrimination in Canada’s military is that it’s not wholly bad.

Thank God Father Stu saw the light

The new film about a Montana priest, Father Stu, starring Mark Wahlberg and Mel Gibson, is ruffling some feathers. I’ve seen it, and didn’t think it was that controversial. Father Stu is based on the true story of a roughneck, smart-aleck, aimless young boxer who retires the gloves early and heads to Hollywood for a film career — only to discover God, the Church and his vocation to the priesthood through his new SoCal Catholic girlfriend.

Catechism must stir faith into action

Near the beginning of what is arguably the Second Vatican Council’s most important document, the Council fathers wrote, “It pleased God, in His goodness and wisdom, to reveal Himself and to make known the mystery of His will... .” Knowing that mystery enables us to share in the life of God.

Readers Speak Out: May 1, 2022

First steps

Your March 22 editorial “Look to Rome” states your commitment to “reconciliation between Canada’s First Nations and its, shall we say, later arrivals.” Cheeky! But overlooking Indigenous beliefs that they always existed on the land, and that “settlers”  were not simply later arrivals but a deceiving, destructive, endless throng that led to extreme social dislocation and loss of life, land and culture? Read Thomas King, Bob Joseph or Jesse Wente for detail.

Editorial: A force for good

There’s a moving van load of unpacking to be done with new data delivered by the Angus Reid Institute and Cardus think tank on the state of organized religion in Canada.

Easter hope rises even in Ukraine

Ivan and Olga (not their real names) drive quickly through the street with their infant daughter Lesia. Their fears are realized as they encounter enemy soldiers with guns levelled. Ivan steps out in front of the car, his arms raised. He glances back at the family he loves. The soldiers open fire. Olga too is executed. We don’t know what happens to Lesia.

Where do all the homeless go?

The statistics are chilling even though they are imperfect. CBC reported that in December 2021, 35 names were added to the Toronto Homeless Memorial list of those who died while homeless in Toronto. The actual number of deaths could be higher. 

Abbreviation falls short. Pls. read. Thx.

Today’s social media world has made abbreviations seem more ubiquitous than ever.

Rising with the joy of every day miracles

When I think about the long list of things I need to practice, resurrection has never made the list. But I have been returning to the theme year after year in my writing. In 2017, I wrote about not being ready to rise. The next year, I was baking buns and reflecting on relaxing into the rising work of God. And then, the danger of daring to embrace joy. Apparently, I need more practice than I thought.

Embrace the call to ecological conversion

Every religion has celebrations tied to the natural world. Celebrations of birth and death, darkness and light, sowing and harvesting all mark the rhythms of our lives and our encounter with God. What does this mean for a humanity hurtling towards the ecological upheaval that a global temperature rise of three degrees promises to deliver? The spectre of climate chaos threatens to disrupt the order by which we connect to God through creation.