Readers Speak Out: September 9, 2018

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  • September 11, 2018

Word of thanks

Our ears are ringing with the onslaught of abuse reports and our shoulders sag with the burden we carry for our Church. We’re all appalled, ashamed and saddened to the core of our being. Rightly so. 

As for penalty to the perpetrators, the public media discussions of how to handle this should never have had to occur. It should begin in the confessional with a penance which suits the sin and then subjugation to the laws which apply to any other person, as this abuse is not only a sin in the eyes of the Church but it is also a crime. 

As these cards are laid on the table, we also see much goodness which must not go unmentioned. I would like to give credit to all the priests, bishops, monsignors and popes of my time who have influenced my life. 

They have taught, forgiven, counselled, ministered and been friends. They have never asked for a penny, never laid a hand on me, except in compassion, and have always lifted me up, never condemning or criticizing. They have nourished my soul and enabled my growth, peace and understanding. 

I thank them all from the bottom of my heart!

Lynn Cristini,

Edmonton, Alta.


Church does no harm

The issue of the abuse by priests should not be a scandal with the Catholic Church. It is the priests and all those involved who are responsible. The Church does not do any harm. God is the Head of the Church. The Father, Son and Holy Spirit does not change. It is human beings that cause crises. 

Yes, Pope Francis is wrong to keep silent. Theodore McCarrick knows what he has done or not done. Bishops, priests, cardinals are human beings as well and are not immune to sin.

I am sorry that all those boys were victims of heinous crimes committed by people who you felt you could trust. Truth is you can only put your trust in Jesus. 

Marie Daquano,

Richmond Hill, Ont.


Proud of statement

When I was a young, pro-life mother with serious health problems, I saw the “Winnipeg Statement” as eminently sensible and merciful. I still do.  

It seems written from the viewpoint of true pastors who respect, believe in and trust the sincere good intentions of their flock and their attempts to live good Catholic lives. People respond to leaders who understand the complexities of marriage, and these bishops must have listened carefully to their parishioners, in or out of reconciliation.

Our Church should be proud of the statement, rather than wanting to see it recanted. It was compassionate and orthodox “in accord with the accepted principles of moral theology.” It has probably enabled many couples to stay faithful to their marriages and to their Church, as well as to the needs of their families.  

Jean Clayton,

London, Ont.


On second thought

Re: A desperate world needs God more than ever, says Lt.-Gen. Roméo Dallaire (Aug. 19-26):

I completely agree with General Dallaire. I had occasion to meet the General while he was on his way to deliver what proved to be one of the most pro-life speeches I had ever heard by a parliamentarian, at the 45th annual National Prayer Breakfast at Ottawa’s Chateau Laurier Hotel in 2010.

I asked him about the March for Life, which was to take place the next day. To my dismay, he confided that he was not with us on the abortion issue.

If I recall, he mentioned the children suffering and dying by the side of the road in Rwanda and feeling that abortion might have been better for them. 

The General has come a long way from the trauma of PTSD and his faith has been restored, thank God. In light of today’s social ills — assisted suicide, euthanasia and abortion. I wonder if he has re-thought his position on a crucial life issue? 

Paul Lauzon,

Ottawa, Ont.

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