Readers Speak Out: September 23, 2018

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  • September 24, 2018

Make reparations

There is a time for mercy and a time for turning over the tables of money exchangers. The time for mercy is over! Now is the time to turn over those proverbial tables.

Our shepherds must stop asking for forgiveness and engage in profound reparation (for sexual abuse victims) in the hope of meriting forgiveness. Only then can the abandoned and abused sheep begin to trust the shepherds.  

And, no, the money must not come from the donations of the faithful but rather from the personal pockets of each predator and enabler, including the pockets of those who kept the secrets.

Dona Tiberio-Smith,

Maple, Ont.


Open to meeting

Re: Abuse survivor demands ‘real’ change (Sept. 16):

Your article about Mr. Swales stated that “A spokesperson said the London diocese had no comment.” That is not entirely accurate. Here is what I sent:

“The Diocese of London does not discuss personal matters or individual cases with the press. It just is not appropriate. It should be noted that Bishop Fabbro has always been open to meeting victims/survivors of abuse. However, if a victim is in the middle of a legal process, such a meeting cannot take place until the completion of such a process.

“The Diocese of London is committed to assisting any victim who comes forward, to provide counselling and reach settlements as applicable. We continue to work to ensure a safe environment in all our churches to prevent abuse from ever happening again.”

Nelson Couto, Communications Officer,

Diocese of London


Time for reflection

Clerics who feel this Pope is too modern and is adapting the Church to a new world should see this is no time for an attack in the media. Surely Archbishop Viganò knew the news media would love a story on the Catholic Church. 

Clericalism is a very old and persistent problem, and could use some reflection. Maybe women could be seen in a more positive role. By that I mean seen as fellow human beings with positions of equality and responsibility. 

Could we look for some reflection before your next editorial?

Virginia Edman,

Toronto, Ont.


Blame bad shepherds

We must be wary of critics who would reform the Church out of existence, remembering she is Christ’s Church, not ours to fashion. The Church has not betrayed us; bad shepherds have. They have robbed Catholics of their birthright and  have closed the door to authentic healing.

Ken Purcell,

Winnipeg, Man.


Tip of iceberg

Re: Clericalism (noun): A policy of maintaining or increasing the power of a religious hierarchy (Sept. 9):

Sanctions against ex-cardinal Theodore McCarrick are the tip of the iceberg in the Catholic Church.The Catholic Church can be healed by returning it to the way of Jesus, not by keeping it on a human path

Mile Pletikosa, 

Scarborough, Ont.


Stay with Church

I am one of the 1.6 million followers of Bishop Robert Barron that Bob Brehl wrote about. I consider Bishop Barron to be one of the most intelligent theologians of the Catholic Church. He has an ability to explain the gospels as they pertain to life nowadays. That is necessary, especially when you have the media presenting the gospels according to their own ideas.

The Church has many good priests and bishops and, as another writer wrote, the Church does nobody harm. It is some priests and bishops who cause harm. 

So, yes, stay with the Church and fight with the Spirit, as Bishop Barron says.

Victor Debono,

Toronto, Ont. 

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