Catholic Register Staff

Catholic Register Staff

Fr. Andrew Hogan made history on July 8, 1974, becoming the first Roman Catholic priest to be elected to the House of Commons. Better known as Father Andy, he would serve two terms before losing in the 1980 election. He died in 2002. There have been two other priests who were MPs at the same time — Fr. Bob Ogle (NDP, 1979-84) and Fr. Raymond Gravel (Bloc Quebecois, 2006-08). In 1980, the Vatican banned priests from seeking political office, though bishops could grant special permission. The Register’s Dan Mothersill wrote about Hogan’s historic victory in the July 20, 1974 issue:


A new English-language hymnal is on the way. The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) has confirmed publishing plans for Music for Catholic Worship, which should be in stock by Lent 2020.

Summer is here which means the busyness of the school year is gone. It’s the perfect time to unplug from the real world and curl up with a good book. That’s why The Catholic Register and Youth Speak News have put together a list of faith-based youth titles that we think young book lovers will love. Stay tuned to our growing list of summer reads: 


On June 30, 1912, a tornado dubbed the Regina Cyclone swept through the city and became the deadliest in Canadian history, killing 28 people. Much of the city was damaged or destroyed, prompting a front-page plea to The Register’s readers in the July 11, 1912 edition from a priest who experienced the storm first-hand:


Catholics across the Archdiocese of Toronto are being asked to support an ongoing protest against the pro-abortion Canada Summer Jobs attestation with their voices and their wallets.

When it comes to reporting on ecumenical and interfaith issues, no one in English North America does it better than The Catholic Register.

Just four months after being released from a South African prison in 1990, Nelson Mandela, the country’s future president, was in the midst of an international tour, visiting countries that had supported the long fight for his release and against South Africa’s apartheid policies. Canada was one of those stops, as reported by Tonia Desiato in The Register of June 30, 1990.


On June 12, 1984, Ontario Premier Bill Davis surprised everyone with the announcement that the province’s Roman Catholic schools would be put on equal footing with the public school system and be fully funded through the end of high school. The end of the long fight to secure the funding — which included intense lobbying efforts by Cardinal Gerald Emmett Carter — also brought out some words of caution by The Catholic Register’s Fr. Tom Raby in his column of June 30, 1984:

June 5 marks the 50th anniversary of the fatal shooting of Sen. Robert Kennedy, less than five years after the murder of his brother President John Kennedy and just two months after Martin Luther King Jr. was gunned down. The 42-year-old Catholic senator was the leading candidate for Democratic nomination for the presidency at the time he was shot in Los Angeles by Sirhan Sirhan, and his death 26 hours later prompted mourning around the world. The next day in Toronto, Bishop F.A. Marrocco eulogized Kennedy at a memorial Mass, as reported in The Register of June 15, 1968: 

Father General Arturo Sosa, leader of over 16,000 Jesuit priests worldwide, attended the ordinations at St. Paul’s Basilica in Toronto, May 19, during his Canada visit. “This moment in the life of the Society, but even more in the life of the Church, is an opening,” he said.

Canadian Jesuits Arthur Suski and Edmund Lo were presented to Archbishop Terry Prendergast for ordination into the priesthood. The archbishop handed each of them a book of the Gospels and said, “Receive the Gospel of Christ, whose herald you now are.  Believe what you read, teach what you believe, and practice what you teach.”