Several saints, mostly martyrs, were separated from the Blessed Sacrament for long periods. Still, the reason why they became saints was because they made the most of their situation.

Speaking Out: Making the most of each day

By  Bernadette Timson, Youth Speak News
  • April 1, 2020

“You better not have any excuses for being bored.”

That was always my parents’ warning at the start of every summer as we had books, board games, bikes and other various activities to enjoy. What they really meant was for us to “take advantage of the situation and appreciate the present as much as possible because there might be something in the future that will make this a fond memory.”

Three weeks ago, I went about my daily routine as usual. Since then, society has slowed to a halt. I am self-quarantining, and my natural cabin fever mentality has made this situation a far cry from pleasant circumstances.

I often find some wisdom learning about an uncomfortable subject that comes to us all — death. I recently read a section of C.S. Lewis’ essays, On Living in an Atomic Age, from 1948. It’s a quick three-paragraph read, of which I retain this three-part lesson: living in dangerous times is not new; we all die one day; don’t let this scare you from making the most of the time that you do have.

The COVID-19 pandemic is not the first time such a case of isolation has occurred in history. In times of war and persecution, people hid out of fear for their lives. This dreadful feeling looms large now as people self-isolate in a bid to slow down the destructive spread of the virus. People are uncertain over their health, fearful over the status of loved ones and anxious about their job security.

I’ve often asked why God would want me to live in this particular era and not 500 years prior or forward. Why the problems relating to this society or not that of another? Regardless of the difficulties, death is the one constant in life. Memento Mori, which is Latin for remember your death, is meant to be said every day by the clergy, and if possible, the laity, to remind us of our shared mortality.

Several saints, mostly martyrs, were separated from the Blessed Sacrament for long periods. Still, the reason why they became saints was because they made the most of their situation.

The current global health crisis is indeed a time when we need the Eucharist and the sacraments the most, and we are suffering by being away from them. However, it also gives us a chance to express gratitude for them and experience solidarity with those who have suffered longer and more often than we have. Many Catholic apostolates are offering examples of how one can make indulgences of their time spent at home for those in greater need of prayer.

You can also get through each day by asking what opportunities are out there. What goals have I put off for too long? Are there new books to read? How can I add new devotions to my faith life?

For anyone looking for a fun challenge, I would prompt them to replace the word “coronavirus” or “COVID-19” with the name of a comical fictional character or to go without saying it all together for at least 24 hours.

(Timson, 21, is finishing her Event Management studies at Humber College in Etobicoke, Ont.)

Comments (1)

This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Hi Bernadette,

Your writing has improved, and is more powerful now so I must also warn you: The entire story you wrote was compelling; however, the last line is inappropriate and you should consider how might I feel, when you tell me to...

Hi Bernadette,

Your writing has improved, and is more powerful now so I must also warn you: The entire story you wrote was compelling; however, the last line is inappropriate and you should consider how might I feel, when you tell me to compare, who I witness coughing, and trembling in fear of death, to what you call a comical fiction.

Your right, I would just refrain all together.

[Bugs Bunny: What's Up Doc, is not what I would like to be saying right now to any doctor. ..]


Yours in friendship,

Brandon

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Brandon Joseph Braga
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