Fr. Scott Lewis is an associate professor of New Testament at Regis College, a founding member of the Toronto School of Theology.

He is a past president of the Canadian Catholic Biblical Association.

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Sept. 13 (Year A) Sirach 27:30-28:7; Psalm 103; Romans 14:7-9; Matthew 18:21-35

In a sense, we all create our own Heaven and hell. It is a fundamental spiritual law that we reap what we sow in one form or another. No one “gets away” with anything — we should not think that the apparent delay of justice is God’s failure or proof of an amoral universe.

God's Word on Sunday: Healing, conversion come with Lord’s presence

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23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A) Sept. 6 (Ezekiel 33:7-9; Psalm 95; Romans 13:8-10; Matthew 18:15-20)

Correcting or admonishing other people is a perilous undertaking. It should be done sparingly and with the utmost care and sensitivity.

God's Word on Sunday: We cannot turn our back on God’s call for us

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22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Aug. 30 (Year A) Jeremiah 20:7-9; Psalm 63; Romans 12:1-2; Matthew 16:21-27

Jeremiah, ever the reluctant prophet, was bitter, disillusioned and angry. He felt that he had been sold down the river by God. In fact, the Hebrew word that is translated as “enticed” has an even stronger connotation — seduction and force.

God's Word on Sunday: Power must be used for benefit of all

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21st Sunday in Ordinary Time, Aug. 23 (Year A) Isaiah 22:15, 19-23; Psalm 138; Romans 11:33-36; Matthew 16:13-20

Power is not a right and not something to be coveted or seized. Any position or exercise of power is for the common good and the benefit of others.

God's Word on Sunday: God’s message is meant for all people

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20th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Aug. 16 (Year A) Isaiah 56:1, 6-7; Psalm 67; Romans 11:13-15, 29-32; Matthew 15:21-28

“Maintain justice and do what is right.”

God's Word on Sunday: True silence is filled with possibilities

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19th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Aug. 9 (Year A) 1 Kings 19:9, 11-13; Psalm 85; Romans 9:1-5; Matthew 14:22-23

God is certainly capable of great deeds of power. This is most evident in the Exodus account of the Old Testament. But there is another side of God — God’s preferred side — that is quiet, gentle and often disguised to the point of invisibility.

God's Word on Sunday: We do not earn what God gives us

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18th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Aug. 2, Isaiah 55:1-3; Psalm 145; Romans 8:35, 37-39; Matthew 14:13-21

What is the catch? Whenever we hear that something is “free,” our suspicions kick in. There must be some hidden angle — nothing is free, we will have to pay in some way.

God's Word on Sunday: Wisdom can never be taken for granted

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17th Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 26 (Year A) 1 Kings 3:5-12; Psalm 119; Romans 8:28-30; Matthew 13:44-52

Imagine that we were offered the granting of one wish. This has been a familiar theme in folklore and legends, and people amuse themselves by thinking of all the possibilities — something like winning the lottery.

God's Word on Sunday: Kindness is sign of strength

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16th Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 19 (Year A) Wisdom 12:13, 16-19; Psalm 86; Romans 8:26-27; Matthew 13:24-43

How should power, strength and sovereignty be expressed? Not in domination, harshness or the imposition of personal will on others. Wisdom describes true power and sovereignty as righteousness, and righteousness as gentleness, patience and mercy.

God's Word on Sunday: God’s Word is seed of transformation

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15th Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 12 (Year A) Isaiah 55:10-11; Psalm 65; Romans 8:18-23; Matthew 13:1-23

Ancient peoples believed that rain was a gift from the gods, and it is easy to see why. Without rain or adequate water, life ceases to exist. Crops fail, vegetation withers and dies, fires rage and sand takes possession of the land.

God's Word on Sunday: Prophetic message applies to our world

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14th Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 5 (Year A) Zechariah 9:9-10; Psalm 145; Romans 8:9, 11-13; Matthew 11:25-30

The Book of Zechariah is a puzzling collection of prophecies written at different points in Israel’s history. Scholars are unsure of the dating of the various parts of the book. But perhaps this vagueness is a blessing, for the prophecies are valid in every time and place, especially our own.