Robert Brehl is a writer in Port Credit, Ont., and can be reached at bob@abc2.ca.

Do you ever wonder if sometimes the world is upside down?

Bob Brehl: Comic gives us lesson in online humanity

By
In the past, we’ve pointed out a decisive — and growing — lack of decorum in the digital age. Far too often people say the nastiest and rudest things in tweets, posts and emails. Things most would never think to say in person.

Bob Brehl: France takes bold step to ban mobile phones in elementary schools

By
A couple months ago, this space was devoted to a new book by a California psychologist and researcher who argues constant use of smartphones is making young people unhappy, even depressed.

Robert Brehl: Christmas treasure found in Klondike gold rush

By
On Christmas Eve during the Klondike gold rush, three young miners found an unexpected treasure more valuable than gold dust, and their chivalry is worth remembering 120 Christmases later.

Comment: The kindred spirits of John Paul I and Francis

By

In last week’s edition of The Register, a page was devoted to the late Pope John Paul I for two newsworthy reasons: Pope Francis is putting him on the path towards canonization and a new book attempts to put to rest the conspiracy theories that he was murdered after only 33 days on the chair of St. Peter.

Faith in civil discourse waxes, then wanes

By
When this column cited a vicious smear campaign against Fr. James Martin, it was expected that some people would disagree with his call to build a bridge of dialogue between the Church and the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. It was also expected some would agree with his call for civil discourse. Naturally, both things occurred.

Comment: Priest caught in vicious smear campaign

By

Fr. James Martin, an American Jesuit, author and media personality, has appeared in this column before for his humour and humility, including his intimate 465-page portrait Jesus: A Pilgrimage.

Comment: The opposite of hate is fear, not love

By

Of all the media coverage following the despicable white supremacist display in Charlottesville and the bumbling reactions from a president, one column in The Globe and Mail really stood out.

Comment: Artificial intelligence is coming, ready or not

By

The other day, I got into a discussion about singularity and artificial intelligence with a computer science student. He’s young, smart and full of optimism. I’m older, debatably wiser and certainly more skeptical about the benefits of AI.

Comment: Political correctness has a life of its own

By

I’ve long been fascinated by political correctness and how it often has a life of its own; either ignoring facts or not bothering to find facts before going off half-cocked.

Comment: Man and the machine battles wear on

By

Driving home after returning a second new dehumidifier that wouldn’t work in less than a week, I couldn’t help thinking about the so-called “good old days” when things were built to last.